Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: your HDTV might be 1080p!?!

  1. #1
    Resident Trooper jaxmkii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Torrington, Connecticut, United States
    Posts
    12,455
    Post Thanks / Like

    your HDTV might be 1080p!?!

    if you HDTV can display 1920x1080 using a PC you can dislay a 1080p image even if you set was never advetised or desined to !!!

    check it out!
    We the people...

  2. #2
    Teh_Insider frosty's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama, United States
    Posts
    19,301
    Post Thanks / Like
    1080p source does not = 1080p displayed. LCD's and plasmas may be able to due to them being progressive by nature, but CRT's may not.

  3. #3
    The ultimate wet blanket
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,284
    Post Thanks / Like
    Anything that can handle 1080 signals should be able to do 1080p as long as the connection has the bandwidth to handle it. That applies to CRTs as well, though there is the very unlikely scenario that there are physical limitations on the speed at which voltages on the deflectors can be swung (maybe too high capacitance or something), and then you might get a problem with doing 1080p. Still, that's unlikely simply because the rates in question aren't that high for modern CRTs above a certain size (~165 MHz).

    The only reason that 1080p isn't advertised is because there's no broadcast HDTV format for 1080p.
    Cell phones have changed mankind. Finally, men have something they can flip out and argue "mine is smaller than yours."

  4. #4
    Resident Trooper jaxmkii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Torrington, Connecticut, United States
    Posts
    12,455
    Post Thanks / Like
    ^^^ so im right?... if your set had the ability to display 1920x1080 whent hooked up to a pc (PCs are progressive right?) AND has hdmi or DVI-D chances are you can display 1080p
    We the people...

  5. #5
    Citizen RavenFox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    658
    Post Thanks / Like
    Better yet get yourself a WS flat panel monitor.

  6. #6
    Veteran Citizen stanDarsh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    2,991
    Post Thanks / Like
    My 19" BenQ LCD Monitor does 1280x1024, so I don't think I'll be playing 1080p games on that, however 1280x720 or 720p shouldnt be a problem, which is good enough for the time being. I even found an HDMI - DVI cable lying around, which I think will be a good start

  7. #7
    Veteran Citizen Gegenki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Watford
    Posts
    2,865
    Post Thanks / Like
    Yesterday I was messing around.
    My TV did 1080i In Gran Turismo 4 using a component cable.
    But when i tried 1080i on my PC, the edges of the screen were cut off - But high def video looked pretty good.

    And then when i tried 1080p I only had about half the screen. It was cut in about the middle and then it was all aligned to the left side so half my screen was blank.

    So what I think you are saying is that for 1080p because I'm connecting to my TV through:
    DVI(Graphics Card) --> D-Sub(VGA TV) = There isnt enough bandwidth for the whole picture yes?

    If so thats pretty amazing and I can't wait for PS3

  8. #8
    Resident Trooper jaxmkii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Torrington, Connecticut, United States
    Posts
    12,455
    Post Thanks / Like
    you have to play around and experiment but im sure i succesfully did play a 1080p image though my pc on my "outdated" Sony KP-65WV700
    We the people...

  9. #9
    Teh_Insider frosty's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Mobile, Alabama, United States
    Posts
    19,301
    Post Thanks / Like
    It depends. Some TV's may prevent 1080p at the hardware level. Note that just because the TV is 1080i compatible, it does not mean it has a true 1920x1080 pixels on screen. That may be causing the screen to be half blank. Another possibility, though unlikley, is that it can only display half of the screen per refresh, because it's interlaced, and theref'ore you are seeing half the screen. This doesn't make as much sense due to the way interlacing works, it displays even then odd (or odd then even for HD) fields in stripes, not a full half of the screen at a time. I'm not sure, 15 pin VGA should handle a 1080p signal. I know it carries a 1680x1050 image, some 400 pixels shy, just fine on my LCD monitor. I use DVI, but used to use VGA and it was fine. Here's another thing to consider, try changing the resolution of your PC to both 1280x720, and 1920x1080 (if you can hit that) and see whih performs better.

    and by the way, Standarsh, it's 1280x720 for 720P

  10. #10
    Veteran Citizen stanDarsh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    2,991
    Post Thanks / Like
    Oops, Typo, thanks for pointing that out. I meant to write 1280 not 1820.

  11. #11
    The ultimate wet blanket
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,284
    Post Thanks / Like
    It depends. Some TV's may prevent 1080p at the hardware level. Note that just because the TV is 1080i compatible, it does not mean it has a true 1920x1080 pixels on screen.
    That's true. It's possible that the microcontroller doesn't even have the firmware for processing a 1080p image. Any less-than-1080 TV that supports 1080i signals still has to scale the image. If the TV is strictly a TV and takes inputs like component that simply have trouble carrying high frequencies, then it may not have the firmware. For that matter, AFAIK, connections like component probably doesn't have the bandwidth to carry a 1080px60Hz signal.

    If it can double as a monitor (e.g. has a DVI connection) or has something high bandwidth like HDMI, then chances are good that it can handle 1080p. DVI can just handle it in terms of speed (165 MHz), though I think there are cases where you may need dual DVI, though not for bandwidth reasons.

    As far as VGA cable is concerned, the cable itself can handle the bandwidth, but since the signal is purely analog and has a pretty large voltage swing and really big current swings, so handling a 125 MHz analog signal on 3 channels takes some higher grade analog components. It would require some pretty beefy BJTs.
    Cell phones have changed mankind. Finally, men have something they can flip out and argue "mine is smaller than yours."

  12. #12
    Citizen Backlash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    620
    Post Thanks / Like
    Somewhat off topic, but I was wondering. Does HD run at 60fps? I know standard definition (NTSC, anyway) runs at ~30fps, but with all the talk about how certain games run at 60fps, you'd think you wouldn't notice a damn thing if TVs display only 30 or so.

  13. #13
    c/:-] Luis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Ourense, Spain
    Posts
    25,114
    Post Thanks / Like
    There has always (or almost) been SD content being displayed at 60fps. And yes, HD content will be displayed at 60fps if required.

    What I don't know though, is whether 1080i content running at 60fps is possible. I believe all progressive formats can run at 60fps, but I just don't know about 1080i and other interlaced formats. EDIT: never mind, it is possible.

    To keep it simple: is there any resolution and/or format that can't be displayed at 60fps? (ignoring PAL and SECAM standards)

  14. #14
    The ultimate wet blanket
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,284
    Post Thanks / Like
    I know standard definition (NTSC, anyway) runs at ~30fps, but with all the talk about how certain games run at 60fps, you'd think you wouldn't notice a damn thing if TVs display only 30 or so.
    With SDTV broadcasts, the source video is always 30 fps, so you will only see the 30 fps, even though it would be divided into two alternating fields at 60 fps. It's also true that cheaper CRT TVs may only have the analog hardware to handle this type of signal, and the source connections may not even carry a 60 Hz progressive signal. Or depending on the connections and the TV, it may be able to handle a 30 Hz progressive signal (and this was true of some HDTVs for quite some time as well).

    The thing is that with interlaced field updates, assuming that the game itself runs at 60 fps, each field array will come from new framebuffer updates. So you'll actually get intermediate motion on each field. This makes the picture not so clean, but it does mean that motion will look smoother.
    Cell phones have changed mankind. Finally, men have something they can flip out and argue "mine is smaller than yours."

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

User Tag List

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •