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Thread: LittleBigPlanet 2 Creation Tutorials and Games

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    LittleBigPlanet 2 Creation Tutorials and Games



    The Most Comprehensive Guide On The Internet


    Useful Links

    Official LittleBigPlanet site
    Playable Tutorials
    LittleBigMap
    LBPWiki
    LBP.me

    Featured Video Tutorials - By Comphermc:

    LBP2-Torials 01: Sequencers
    LBP2-Torials 02: Signal Addition And Subtraction
    LBP2-Torials 03: Probability With Randomizers
    LBP2-Torials 04: Sackbots, Followers And Checkpoints
    LBP2-Torials 05: Health Bars And Addition Applications
    LBP2-Torials 06: Menus With Pulses And Time-Independent Movie Cameras
    LBP2-Torials 07: Player Counters And Wireless Signals
    LBP2-Torials 08: Infinite Scrolling And Wireless Signals
    LBP2-Torials 09: Level Linking
    LBP2-Torials 10: Level Linking And Data Transfer
    LBP2-Torials 11: Ordered Inputs And Lockboxes (Part 1)
    LBP2-Torials 11: Ordered Inputs And Lockboxes (Part 2)
    LBP2-Torials 12: Working With Extra Layers
    LBP2-Torials 13: Sackbot Acting
    LBP2-Torials 14: Sackbot Automation
    LBP2-Torials 15: Sackbot AI
    LBP2-Torials 16: Movie Cameras and Cutscenes
    LBP2-Torials 17: Secret Counters
    LBP2-Torials 18: Sackbot Acrobatics
    LBP2-Torials 19: Theck and Thack Sublayers
    LBP2-Torials 20: Feedback Loops (part 1)
    LBP2-Torials 20: Feedback Loops (part 2)
    LBP2-Torials 21: Speed Sensors
    LBP2-Torials 22: Slow Motion Effects
    LBP2-Torials 23: Using the Merge Glitch
    LBP2-Torials 24: Ledge Climbing
    LBP2-Torials 25: Ladder Climbing

    Video Tutorials - General:

    360 Degree Aiming
    3D Layer Followers
    3D Objects
    5 Level Elevator
    _______________A_______________
    Ac-130 POV Shooter
    Aiming System 1
    Aiming System 2
    Analog Memory Cells & Other Useful Electronics
    Analog Signals: Detecting Changes
    Analog Signal Plotter (Work In Progress)
    Analog Signal Processing Via Logic Gates
    Animated Decorations
    Anti-Gravity Machine
    _______________B_______________
    Bounce-Pad: Flickering
    Building A Crane
    _______________C_______________
    Cameras And Dialogue: Part 1
    Cameras And Dialogue: Part 2
    Cameras For Each Player
    Camera: Movies
    Cameras: Movies/Films/Cut-scenes
    Camera Rotation And Adv. Mover Solved
    Car: Boost 1
    Car: Boost 2
    Car: How To Make a Car
    Car: Logic - Forward/Reverse
    Car: Logic (Simple)
    Car: Part 1
    Car: Part 2
    Car: Remote Controlled
    Combination Lock - Part 1
    Combination Lock - Part 2
    Control Analogue Signal With Digital Signal And Vice-Versa
    Control Icons And Custom Unicode Symbols
    Controlinator Basics
    Controlinator: How To Use
    Controlinator: Multiple
    Controlinator: Respawn In Controlinator
    Contolinator: Tricks
    Create
    Create Mode. Part 1: New Materials, Global Controls And Movers
    Create Mode. Part 2: Rotators And New Sensors
    Create Mode. Part 3: Basic And Advanced Logic
    Create Mode. Part 4: World & Object Tweakers & Powerups
    Create Mode. Part 5: Sackbots, Controlinators and Music
    Create Mode. Part 6: Miscellaneous
    Creatinator: Coaster Tutorial
    Creatinator: Vacuum Gun
    Creating A Flying Machine
    Creating Tips
    Creating With Foofles
    Cursor Tracking System/Barriers
    Custom Jump Chip
    Custom Water Volumes: Part 1
    Custom Water Volumes: Part 2
    _______________D_______________
    Digital Clock 1
    Digital Clock 2
    Digital Clock: Controllable
    Digital Clock/Counter
    Direction Splitter/Direction Combiner
    Double Jump 1
    Double Jump 2
    Double Jump 3
    Double Jump 4
    Double Jump Part 1 - One Shot Button w/Debounce
    Double Jump Part 2 - One Shot Timer
    Double Jump Part 3 - Toggle Reset
    Dynamic Weather
    _______________E_______________
    Electricity Movement
    Elevator: Stop On Individual Floors
    Explosion Effects
    _______________F_______________
    Fire: Dousable/Spreadable
    Fire: Dynamic
    First Person Shooter - Part 1
    First Person Shooter - Part 2
    First Person Shooter - Part 3
    First Person Shooter - Part 1
    First Person Shooter - Part 2
    First Person Shooter - Part 3
    Flight: Advanced
    _______________G_______________
    Game Design: Breakout
    Game Design: Pong
    Game Design: Space Invaders - Part 1
    Game Design: Space Invaders - Part 2
    Game Design: Space Odyssey
    Glitch: Broken Powerups
    Glitch: Clone Sackboy
    Glitch: Custom Scoreboard
    Glitch: Glue Distant Objects Without Any Physical Connection
    Glitch: Invisible Objects
    Glitch: Light Without Light Source
    Glitch: Major 4th Layer Glitch
    Glitch: Material Layer Glitch
    Glitch: Merging Objects With A Checkpoint
    Glitch: Sackboy In 4th Layer
    Glitch: Stickers On Scoreboard
    Glitch: Tweakable Paintball (and others)
    Glitch: Twist Glitch
    Glitch: Walkthrough Glitch
    Glitch: Water Glitch
    Grid Movement 1
    Grid Movement 2 - Using Selectors
    Grid Rotation
    _______________H_______________
    Hologram: Animation
    Hologram: Health Bar 1
    Hologram: Health Bar 2
    Hologram: Health Bar 3
    Hologram: Sprite Making
    How To Make A Level
    HUD Creation Part 1
    HUD Creation part 2
    _______________I_______________
    Ice Fatality Tutorial
    Invisible Limitation
    _______________J_______________
    Jump Through Glass
    _______________L_______________
    Land Mines
    Lava Flow
    Layer Limitations
    Level Creation - Scenery
    Light-Sabar
    Light-Sabre: Burning
    Lock-Box
    Logic: 4x4 Memory Register
    Logic: Advanced 1
    Logic: Advanced 2
    Logic: Advanced - Part 1
    Logic: Basic 1
    Logic: Basic 2
    Logic: Centralized And Defered Counting
    Logic: Emitters
    Logic: Hide And Seek
    Logic: Mission Logic
    Logic: Movers
    Logic: Part 1 - Constant On
    Logic: Part 2 - Inverting
    Logic: Part 3 - On Then Off With Time Limit
    Logic: Part 4 - On Then Random
    Logic: Pyromania And Basic
    Logic: Solid State
    Logic: Timers
    Logic: Tricks
    Logic: Tricks: Analogue Signal Analization
    _______________M_______________
    Making A Tank
    Mech Robot: Part 1
    Mech Robot: Part 2
    Mech Robot: Part 3
    Mech Robot: Part 4
    Menu: Advanced 1
    Menu: Advanced 2
    Menu: Alternative Cursor Movement
    Menu: Basic
    Menu: Money/Shop
    Menu: Part 1
    Menu: Part 2 - Mouse UI Tutorial
    Menu: Part 1
    Menu: Part 2
    Menu: Part 3
    Menu: Part 1
    Menu (And Teleportation): Part 2
    Menu: Selection Screen 1
    Menu: Selection Screen 2
    Microchips: How To Decorate Them
    Microchips: Pulse Power Selector
    Microchips: Reusable Functions With Microchips/Threshold Chip
    Minesweeper: Behind The Scenes
    Monitor
    Moonwalking
    MOVE: Analysis - Part 1
    MOVE: Analysis - Part 2
    MOVE: Analysis - Part 3
    MOVE: Movinator: Cursor Animation
    MOVE: Sticker Panel: Easy Animation
    Movers: Advanced 1
    Movers: Advanced 2
    Movers And Sequencers (basics)
    Movers: Electric Movers
    Moving Platforms 1
    Moving Platforms 2
    Moving Platforms 3
    Music Chooser
    Music: Ipod Nano
    Music Sequencer 1
    Music Sequencer 2
    Music Sequencer 3
    Music Sequencer 4
    Music Sequencer 5
    Music Sequencer 6
    Music Sequencer 7
    _______________N_______________
    Number Of Players 1
    Number Of Players 2
    Number Of Players 3
    _______________O_______________
    Object Tweakers
    Objects As Actors
    _______________P_______________
    Paintinator: How To Make A Wall Disappear
    Perma Switch, Set/Reset And 'One-Shooter'
    Platforms: In/Out Movers 1
    Platforms: In/Out Moving 2
    Platforms: In Out Movers And Street Lights
    Platforms: Floating
    Platforms: Flying
    Platforms: Follower Based
    Playing With Timers: Part 1 - Basic Tricks
    Playing With Timers: Part 2 - Logaritmic Timer
    Playing With Timers: Part 3 - Analog Signal Smother And Noise Generator
    Playing With Timers: Part 4 - Tape-broken Sounds + Thunder Lightning
    Points As Money
    Popit Features-Categorize & Organize
    Portals
    Power Ups (Without Sackbots)
    Pulse Power Selector
    _______________R_______________
    Radius Detector (Closeness)
    Rain Drops Into Ice Drops
    Real Time Strategy
    _______________S_______________
    Sackbot: Aiming
    Sackbot: And Bouncepads
    Sackbot: Basics 1
    Sackbot: Basics 2
    Sackbot: Basics 3
    Sackbot: Basics 4
    Sackbot: Basics: Pan-Cam
    Sackbot: Basic enemies
    Sackbot: Check Point 1
    Sackbot: Check Point 2
    Sackbot: Comphermc Wizard - Part 1
    Sackbot: Comphermc Wizard - Part 2
    Sackbot: Comphermc Wizard - Part 3
    Sackbot: Comphermc Wizard - Part 4
    Sackbot: Controlling 1
    Sackbot: Controlling 2
    Sackbot: Controlinator - Part 1
    Sackbot: Controlinator - Part 2
    Sackbot: Control With Controllinator
    Sackbot: Control Override
    Sackbot: Control Synchronization And Filtering
    Sackbot: Creatures
    Sackbot: Dashing
    Sackbot: Dash Power
    Sackbot: Death Cut-scenes
    Sackbot: Destroy With Paintinator
    Sackbot: Emit things (Sackbot weapons)
    Sackbot: Extras
    Sackbot: Flee From A Tag
    Sackbot: Flipping
    Sackbot: Flying
    Sackbot: Giving Them Powers
    Sackbot: Heat Vision
    Sackbot: Kill By Circuit
    Sackbot: Leaping Tall Buildings
    Sackbot: Making A Zombie - Part 1
    Sackbot: Making A Zombie - Part 2
    Sackbot: Part 1 - Transforming Sackbot
    Sackbot: Part 2 - Fly, Hover And Run Fast
    Sackbot: Part 3 - Custom Jump
    Sackbot: Part 4 - Heat Vision
    Sackbot: Part 5 - Super Breath
    Sackbot: Physics
    Sackbot: Psychic/Telekinesis
    Sackbot: Remote Control
    Sackbot: Respawn Point
    Sackbot: Rewind
    Sackbot: Roll
    Sackbot: SackSuit Microchip
    Sackbot: Slap Sensor
    Sackbot: Spawning - Part 1
    Sackbot: Spawning - Part 2
    Sackbot: Stuck In Ice
    Sackbot: Super Sackbot
    Sackbot: Tracking Camera
    Sackbot: Tube Bots - Part 1
    Sackbot: Tube Bots - Part 2
    Sackbot: Tube Bots - Part 3
    Sackbot: Wall Jumping
    Selector-Based Counter/Timer Display - Part 1
    Selector-based Counter/Timer Display - Part 2
    Selector: Priority Behaviour - Part 1 (Counting Objects)
    Selector: Priority Behaviour - Part 2 (Prioritized AI)
    Sequencers: Part 1 - Basic Intro
    Sharing Costumes
    Shooter: Sniper Level
    Shooter: Target Shooter
    Smoke Machine
    Spotlight Follows Player
    Stickers: Custom Stickers
    _______________T_______________
    Tank Tracks
    Teleportation 1
    Teleportation 2
    Teleportation 3
    Teleportation: Death-less/Bot-less
    Top-Down: Character (Simple)
    Top-Down: Jumping Car
    Top-Down: Racer
    Top-Down: Racer - Lap Counter
    Top-Down: Twin-Stick Shooter - Part 1: Basic Controls
    Top-Down: Twin-Stick Shooter - Part 2: Spawning Enemies
    Top-Down: Twin-Stick Shooter - Part 3: Switching To A Remote Controllinator
    Top-Down: Twin-Stick Shooter - Part 4: Health Bars
    Top-Down: Vehicle 1
    Top-Down: Vehicle 2
    Top-Down: Vehicle 3
    Top-Down: Vehicle 4
    Top-Down: Vehicle 5
    Top-Down: Vehicle Controller
    Transfering Data Between Levels
    True/False States With Counters
    Twin Stick Shooter: Part 1
    Twin Stick Shooter: Part 2
    Twin Stick Shooter: Part 3
    _______________W_______________
    Walking Legs Tutorial
    Walking Robot
    Wall Jumping Tutorial. Part 1
    Wall Jumping Tutorial. Part 2
    Wall Walking
    Weapon: Destroy Everything
    Weapon: Cooldown
    Weapon: Switching
    Weapon: Turret
    Wireless Mode

    Written Tutorials:

    3D Objects
    8-Way Control
    _______________A_______________
    Analogue: Determining Origin Of Strongest Signal
    Analogue: Divide Signals
    Analogue: Multiple values (Range 0-100)
    Analogue: Signal Display
    Analogue To Digital Conversion
    Animation: Speeding Up And Slowing Down
    _______________B_______________
    Black Hole
    Bounding Box: Object limitations
    _______________C_______________
    Camera: Creating Cut-scenes
    Camera: Creating Movies
    Camera: Cut-Scenes
    Camera: Record Attacks
    Camera: Objects As Actors
    Camera: Tilt With Pad
    Changable Attack
    Character Selector
    Code Sequence
    Complex Logic Chips
    Complicated Creating: 5 Steps To Make Or Break A Level
    Control Icons And Custom Unicode Symbols
    Controllinator: Various Damage
    Controllinator: Choose Working Buttons
    Convert Timer Into Health Bar
    Costumes: Design
    Costumes: Sharing
    Costumes: Making Skins
    Counter: Buffering Events
    Counter: Simple
    Creatinator Customization
    Creation Tips. Various
    Creator Entrance
    _______________D_______________
    Decoration Tips
    Digital Counter: Scalable
    Digital Readout: 8/20 Bit
    Digital Value Functions
    Direction Inverter
    _______________E_______________
    Elevator
    _______________F_______________
    Fonts: Custom With Little Thermo Use
    _______________G_______________
    Glitch: 3D Camera
    Glitch: Deluxe Guide
    Glitch: Hologram
    Glitch: Light Without Light Source
    Glitch: Link Distant Objects Without Physical Connection
    Glitch: Merge Items
    Glitch: Merging Objects With A Checkpoint
    Glitch: Paintinator - Without The Metal Gear Solid Pack
    Glitch: Plasma Colour
    Glitch: Walk-Through Objects
    Glitch: Walk Through Walls
    Gravity Flipping
    Grid-Movement: Fast And Simple
    Global Sound Switches
    Guitar Hero Like Game
    _______________H_______________
    Health/Damage For Values 1 to 864000
    High Gravity, High Jump
    Hologram: Black Holograms
    Hologram: Animation
    Hologram: Animation Without Flicker
    Hologram: Menu
    Hologram: Stickers
    Homing Missile: Advanced
    Homing Missile: Basic
    Hover Tech
    Hud Creation
    _______________I_______________
    Invisible Thin Wall
    _______________L_______________
    Level Design
    Logic: Analogue Logic - Notation
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 1 - Fundamentals
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 2 - Sorting & Addition
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 3 - DAC & ADC
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 4 - Basics Of Sampling & Scaling
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 5 - Division & Multiplication
    Logic: Analogue Logic Toolset (Zero Latency)
    Logic: Basic
    Logic: Binary
    Logic: Charging Logic
    Logic: Custom Logic
    Logic: LBPC Logic Pack Tools With LBP2 Gizmos
    Logic: Light Sequencer
    Logic: Managing Complex Logic
    Logic: Observations About Player Data And Gates
    Logic: Organization Tips
    Logic: Part 1 - AND And OR
    Logic: Part 2 - Microchips
    Logic: Part 3 - NOT, Truth-Tables, XOR And Inversions
    Logic: Part 4 - Timers And Counters
    Logic: Perfect Hold/Tap Logic
    Logic: Permanent Switch
    Logic: Selector - Stopping It Cycling Back On Itself
    Logic: Speed Sensor, Signal Change Sensor
    Logic: Tidbits
    Logic: Understanding Logic - Part 1
    Logic: Understanding Logic - Part 2
    _______________M_______________
    Menu: Grid And Gameboard
    Menu: In-depth Tutorial
    Microchip: Battery Without Battery, Looping Signal
    Microchip: Step By Step
    MOVE: Brain-Crane: Large Checkpoint/Powerups
    MOVE: Brain-Crane: Without MOVE
    MOVE: Movinator: Cursor
    MOVE: Movinator: Twist And Rotate
    MOVE: Opaque Material: Tricks
    MOVE: Paint-Tool: Detailed Paintings
    MOVE: Paint-Tool: General Tips
    Movers And Precision
    Movers: Fixing Wonky Movers
    Movers: Move At Right Angles
    Moving Platforms Without Pistons
    Moving Words
    Music Sequencer: 10 Things You Didn't Know
    Music Sequencer: Doing More With Music Remixing/Special-FX
    Music Sequencer: Synchronised To Normal Sequencer
    Music Sequencer: Something You May Not Know
    Music Sequencer: Transposing To Music Sequencer
    _______________N_______________
    Nearest Player Controlinator
    _______________O_______________
    Opening/Closing Door
    _______________P_______________
    Paintinator: Shoot Anything
    Paint: Paint Like A Pro
    Perfect Stopwatch
    Personal Anti-Projectile Shield
    Platforming: Making A Great Platformer
    Popit: Mega Storage
    _______________R_______________
    Race Gates Using Wires
    Real Time Strategy: Cursor Movement
    Release Switch
    Rooms For Maze Game
    _______________S_______________
    Sackbot: Advanced Control
    Sackbot: A.I And Logic Tutorials
    Sackbot: And Destroyer
    Sackbot: Attributes/Lives
    Sackbot: Breadcrumb Follower
    Sackbot: Checkpoint System
    Sackbot: Checkpoint With Sackboy Checkpoint Visuals
    Sackbot: Controllable in 3D layers
    Sackbot: Die When Fall From Height
    Sackbot: Double Jump
    Sackbot: Knocking Back When Hit
    Sackbot: Make Selector React To Sackbot Emotions
    Sackbot: Patrol Bot That Can't See Through Walls
    Sackbot: Roll
    Sackbot: Slap Sensor
    Sackbot: Swim And Move Under Water
    Sackbot: Toggle Between Sackbot And Controllinator
    Sackbot: Toggle Between Sackbots
    Sackbot: Toggle Multiple Sackbots With One Controllinator
    Sackbot: Wall Climbing
    Sackbot: Weapon Selector
    Scoreboard/Counter
    Scrolling/Moving Words
    Sequence/Object Emitter/Generator
    Signal Trapping
    Single Digit Score Giver
    Special Effects
    Special Orbs/Secrets And Rewards
    Speed, Rotation And Length Units
    _______________T_______________
    Tag Tip
    Teleportation: Cursor Based
    Teleportation: Seamless
    Teleportation: Simple Deathless
    Tips And Tricks
    Thermometer: Low Therm Hologram
    Thermometer: Infinite Thermometer Trick
    Top-Down: Bumper Car Logic
    Top-Down: Controllable Object
    Top-Down: Fog Out Areas
    Top-Down: Movement
    Top-Down: Various
    Top-Down View (another Way)
    _______________U_______________
    UV Tool Tricks
    _______________V_______________
    Vehicle Transmission Logic
    Voice Recording 1
    Voice Recording 2
    _______________W_______________
    Weapons: Cool-down Timers
    Wireless Damage Sensor

    Game Videos (For Inspiration):

    _______________A_______________
    A16-bit_chris: Mario World 1-1 (8-Bit)
    Alexgangsta4: Art World
    Als_TheGamer: High Tech Cave 3
    Angel-Box: Pengauno
    Arnieboy74: Batman The Dark Knight Rises (Movie)
    _______________B_______________
    Barnaky-CZ: Disney Park
    Basketsnake: Honeyland
    Beast_Maker: Cardboard Cutout
    Bender_82: The Amazon
    Blastroid: Sackeratinator 3000
    Bloo_Boy: Moonlight Caverns
    Bluetonberry: Classic Zelda 1-1
    _______________C_______________
    Chazprime: Donkey Kong (retro)
    Chicoleunis: Da Vinci's first handcrafted Factory
    Choeb: Bomberman 8-Bit Style 2
    Chimpanzee: Pegged 2
    CitrusRobot: The Great Forest: Moomamoomas
    Coasterfreak1235: Bejewelled
    Comphermc: Rubik's Cube
    Comphermc: The Fourth Wall
    Comphermc: Wizard: Chapter 1 - From Within
    Crazy_Tito: Mystic Cave
    cRckls: !CALAVERA! Pinball
    Cuzfeeshe: Vectroids
    _______________D_______________
    Deewtog12: Block Zombies
    Dethoptix: LittleBigZelda Engine V1.1
    Distinct-Creator: Fiore, A Relaxing Platformer
    DVCV92: Little Big Puzzles
    _______________E_______________
    EaziG: Flowtation
    ElevenBane: Wooly Bully
    Evret: Time To Rewind
    Exalted_Yawn: Ivory Tower - The Cascading Spire
    _______________F_______________
    Fastbro: Frostbite DX
    Felkroth: Frozen Flame - Chapter 1 (part 1)
    Felkroth: Frozen Flame - Chapter 1 (part 2)
    Foggles: Aliens V Zombots
    Foofles: Maximum Carnage
    Fotosynthesis1:Spike World [Extended]
    FriendlyCreators: Metallic Sky-City
    Fyshokid: Stereo/mono 2
    _______________G_______________
    Gevurah22 : Dragon Knight (work in progress)
    Gevurah22: The Fist of Craft Earth
    Gonflette: Realistic Pinball Simulation
    Gruntosuk: Geometry Wars
    Gruntosuk: Venice is sinking
    Gurichan: Pac-man
    Gyro_bot: Yeti Must Sleep!! V30
    _______________H_______________
    Halestorm_6: Mini Golf (1-4 players)
    Hm83: Pinball Gold
    Hoplyte: Sacknight 1: Fetch Quest of the King
    Hoplyte: Sacknight 1: Fetch Quest of the King (part 2
    Hymanator:Chu Chu Rocket
    _______________I_______________
    I_Pinky_I: Moon Lander 2
    _______________J_______________
    Jaeyden: Dragon Slayer Part 1 & 2
    Jaslow: If Trees Could Speak
    JayveewII60: Here Kitty-Kitty (Movie)
    JayveewII60: Operation Rocking Chair! (Movie)
    Jiggycake: Block Planet
    Johnee: Blast Radius
    Jump_button: Side/Top Down Platfomer|8-BIT
    Jump_Button: Black & White Planet 3
    JustinArt: Tilt, Roll and Drop
    _______________K_______________
    Kawlo: Kapootie Forest 2
    _______________L_______________
    Ladylyn1: Zombird Apocalypse Preview
    LBPCraftsman: Caves Of Crystal (Music)
    LBPCraftsman: Eerie Swamp (Music)
    LBPCraftsman: Ocean Floor (Music)
    LBPCraftsman: Sound Barrier (Music)
    LBPCraftsman: Quantum (Music)
    L1ghtmare: Cyberstrata
    Lockstitch: A Realm Forgotten
    Lockstitch: For Vanished Heights
    Lockstitch:Obsidian Depths
    Lockstitch: Refuse Ridge
    Lockstitch: Remnant Ignotus
    Lockstitch: Vile Anchorage
    Luos_83: Lockpick's Maze
    Luos_83:Master of Momentum
    Luos_83:Shady Functions
    Luos_83: The Ancient Cave of New Beh'Ta
    _______________M_______________
    Makotoi: Peggle
    Malhat06: Patchwork World
    Mat1989Rudo: Angry Birds - Level 1
    Mcdonald1967: Crafting-platformer
    Metalhead_AS: A Broken Paradise
    Metalhead_AS: Ruins of Albion
    Mick_Leopard: An Average Adventure - 1st Discovery
    MistyPahasapa: Getting Into The Swing
    Mnnska: Flowerbucket!
    Mr_Hijinx: Bunchy's Adventure (a pixel platformer)
    MrShuanji: Little Big Fantasy: Goddess War - The Journey
    MuddledMuppet: Sackberg Presents: Hamlet - To be or not to be Created (Movie)
    _______________N_______________
    NeoNintendo5: Monochrome
    Nichrome_Dragon: Sonic The Hedgehog: Green Hill Zone - Act:1
    Nichrome_Dragon: Sonic The Hedgehog: Green Hill Zone - Act:2
    Nichrome_Dragon: Sonic The Hedgehog: Green Hill Zone - Act:3
    NonI100Percent: Flat World 2
    Nuclearfish: Clockworx 2
    _______________P_______________
    Pate59: The Mountain of Motocross
    PatrickP4: Colours In Concealment
    Pencil_Rain: Poultry Panic
    Phort: Cave Story - First Cave
    Pickled-Punk: Deliver me from Eve
    Pickled-Punk: Deliver me from Eve: Adventurers District
    Pickled-Punk: Deliver me from Eve: The Moolah Nightmarket
    Pirmaut: Icarus Type Alpha (The Parallax Zone)
    Polloizarraz43: Sony Vs Marvel Vs Capcom
    Poms: Magnetic Fields
    Poms: The Lost Pharao
    PwnArtist: Beta Complex
    _______________Q_______________
    QueenCherry: Madame Pipe
    QueenCherry: Skytation
    QueenCherry: Granny Gertrude's Babysitting Center
    QueenCherry: Dream a Little Dream
    _______________R_______________
    Ramore: Aztec Secret
    Ratchet_PSN: Minesweeper
    Rhansen2: Prius_Eco Adventure
    RikiRiki-Ita: Wooden Paradise
    Ruof: Little Platformer 2
    Ruof: Starry Night
    Ryan Richards94: Mouse Maze 1
    _______________S_______________
    Sasukeuchica: Duck Hunt
    Sasukeuchica: Platforms In The Jungle
    Scorpskull: Lights and Shadows
    Simsim0001: Frogger
    ShadowriverUB: Tetris
    ShamgarBlade: Shamgar's Hideout
    Shawneboi: Viohazard
    Sir_Linque: Sackbot X
    Smasher1116789 : Monster Pinball 2
    Smashrash: The Floating Islands Of Kaladar
    SneakySteve1983: Puzzle Rooms 2
    Spenson66: Clove Space
    Spenson66: Clove 2: Depths - Area 01
    Spidermaguire: Affraid (Movie)
    Splapp-me-do: Sackro Machines Championship
    Steve_big_guns: Mediterranean Street Racing
    Sx_Shookie99: Honey Factory Fiasco (Prologue)
    Sx_Shookie99: The Calamitous Clock
    Sx_Shookie99: The Unknown Depths of the Cavernous Catacombs
    Sylzoid: SODA BLOB - RETRO Adventures (World-1)
    Syroc: Caribbean Carnage
    _______________T_______________
    Tawarf: Divine Nature
    Theadipose: UNO - Classic card game
    The_Lewk: Little Big Battle Racing
    The_Lewk: Tron Lightcycle Battle
    ToykyoMegaplex: La Tea Die
    ToykyoMegaplex: What Goes Up Must Go Down
    TripleTremelo: Cause and Effect 5
    _______________U_______________
    Urbandevill: Galactic Base Defence 1.3
    Urbandevill: Omicron: Neon City
    _______________V_______________
    Vandz: Perceptive Dreams
    _______________W_______________
    WillGuitarGuy: Cogpunks - Meeting The Baker
    _______________X_______________
    xSLEVENx: Obscurity
    xTrophx: Karkaneias Caves
    Last edited by cliffbo; 10-06-2011 at 04:37 PM.

  2. #2
    c/:-] Luis's Avatar
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    LBP1 thread? Let's delete it!

  3. #3

  4. #4
    PSN: GribbleGrunger cliffbo's Avatar
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    some must see levels in the first post. latest at top of list

    ---------- Post added at 10:41 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:54 PM ----------

    you might also like to check out LBPWiki in my sig. it's only just launched, so don't expect a hell of a lot of content yet

    ---------- Post added at 10:48 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:41 PM ----------

    Thank to Shiwayari over at LBPcentral

    Super accurate, fast and simple grid movement

    Hi everyone, I haven't been here (at least not posting) for a while again, and I'll probably be away again (very little time), but of course I got myself LBP2 at release

    Some might still know I was looking into grid movement in the beta. I got something okay, but I tried to look deeper into it today. What I mean with grid movement is basically what's used in various puzzle games; blocks moving in fixed intervals.

    I haven't seen any grid movement logic yet, so here's what I found.

    First the most important stuff: The specs

    - 100% accurate alignment on grid, no matter how fast you press the buttons
    - Moving at 0,1s Intervalls, may be possible even faster
    - Excluding a controllinator and an advanced mover, it only needs 8 logic components for left/right movement!
    - Can be expanded to do 2D movement, of course.

    And here's how to do it:



    There are 3 Timers, 2 And-Gates, 1 Or-Gate, and one Direction Splitter/Combiner

    The timer on the left is set to 0,1s; Count Down; Inverted
    Both timers on the right are set to 0,1s (time actually doesn't matter); Count Down, Not Inverted
    Mover is set to 100% acceleration and 100% deceleration!

    In the picture, the grid-blocks are one large grid unit big. The mover is set to 30,0 speed and moves one big-grid unit per pulse. Adjust your speed accordingly, depending on how big your grid should be.

    And that's it; I think that's pretty awesome

    If you want to add the second dimension movement, repeat the same pattern for the other 2 directions and hook all 4 directions to the same Or Gate (the same one which is on the picture, just with 4 inputs)
    You will have 5 Timers, 4 And-Gates, 1 Or-Gate with 4 inputs, 2 Direction-Splitters, 2 Direction-Combiners

    Theres' still an extra adjustment to do for 2D movement though. You have to make sure that the player cannot input 2 directions simultaneosly (e.g. by holding down left/down on the D-pad), because that will screw up the deceleration again.

    To achieve this, use a Xor-Gate with 2 (or 4) inputs and connect both direction buttons (or all 4 outputs of the direction splitters) to it. Add a third input to all the And-Gates and connect the Xor-Output to it. Done.

    (Only negative effect: you can't hold down buttons anymore, this can be fixed though, but I'm sure you'll figure it out if you need it.)

    For everyone lazy, here's how the complete 2D movement looks like:



    So how and why does it work?

    The problem with grid movement is that movers need a specific amount of time to decelerate, even on 100% deceleration.
    If you just use a basic pulse as input for the mover, it will look like it works at first, but the moment you press the buttons a little faster, it screws up the grid alignment.
    And to prevent that, all you have to do is put a delay after each button press, which is what I did. Now the lowest time is 0,1s and the second lowest is 0,2s, meaning at first you'd think there would have to be at least 0,2s delay between each button press, which is already not so welcome.
    A timer hooked to it's own reset however, outputs a shorter pulse than 0,1s, which means you can make the delay be 0,1s, which is twice as fast and results in "smooth" controls.


    Back in beta, a pulse using a Nor-Gate and Counter (Nor-Gate connected to itself and to a counter-increment, Counter connected to Nor, Nor used as output; credit to rtm223) was even faster that the self-resetting-timer, so it might be possible to get even faster movement (if anyone needs that). You'd have to test the grid alignment first though, because the cooldown might not be enough for the mover to decelerate completely.


    I'm feeling a little stupid now thinking back how I spent days in beta to get 100% accurate grid movement, but still ended up with not-so-good controls

    I hope this helps some of you, maybe we'll see some nice puzzle games in the future with this. I want to make one, but probably won't have the time to do so.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I just found a pretty good way to make automated down-movement (gravity) possible with this concept!
    This is not a solution if you need to have continuos (stepless) down-movement (i.e. you only want to stay on grid in the left/right dimension, while falling down).

    But for games like tetris where the blocks need to stay on grid in 2D all the time, this should work pretty well.
    Also, the controls might get a bit chunky if you need really fast down movement, so it's not a perfect solution.


    It needs a bit more logic though which makes it kind of hard to explain..
    The first thing you need to do is make yourself a controllinator that only accepts a single button input a time and also has a short delay after each button press. That delay can be a single Nor-Gate Pulse though.
    Btw. I tested the frequenzy of the Nor-Gate pulse. It's 15 Hz, so you could press 15 buttons a second.

    What I did then is I connected a timer that resets itself to the "down" output of the controllinator. So it will output a down signal in intervals equal to the target time. The problem that is left is that the player could do one of these:
    - Press a button at the exact time that the timer outputs a down signal.
    - Press a button just before the timer outputs a down signal.
    - Press a button directly after the timer outputs a down signal.

    All of these 3 have a possibilty to break the grid alignment. So we need to remove these possibilies.
    We need 2 Nor-Gate/Counter Pulses for that.

    You need to adjust the counters target count of the first pulse so that it will take just a tad less time to reach it's target count that the timer takes to reach it's target time. For example, if your timer is 1,0seconds, that would be equal to a target count of 15 (because it pulses with 15Hz). We need a bit less, so we'd set the target count to 14.

    Now you connect that counter to the input of a second Nor-Gate/Counter pulse. The target count of the second counter should be 3 or 2. (I think 3 is better, but you can try if 2 works for you too)

    Connect the output of this second counter to a Not-Gate and connect the Not-Gate to the piece of logic that tells your controllinator to only accept one button at a time (I think a Xor-Gate is the best solution for that).


    These descriptions are always hard to read, so here's a screenshot of the piece of logic needed:


    The components on the right is the timer connected to the "move down" output. The 2 components on the left are the counters of the pulses; and the Xor-Gate prevents simultanous button inputs (all buttons are connected to it)
    ____________________________

    So what does this all do?
    Let's assume the player is hammering the buttons nonstop -

    - The timer activating your "move down" signal starts to count up from 0.0s, while at the same time the counter of the first pulse starts to count up from 0.
    - The counter reaches it's target count just a tad before the timer fills up.
    - It activates the second pulses counter, which starts to count up. This will take 3/15 of a second.
    - While this second counter is filling up, the player will not be able to input any more signals.

    - The timer reaches it's target count at the time that the second counter reaches count 1. Meaning player input has been disabled for 1/15 of a second; and your object will move one down on the grid.
    - Player input is still disabled for 2/15 of a second, because the second counter still needs to count from 1 to 3.


    Luckily 1/15 of a second seems to be enough for the deceleration to finish, so the grid alignment will not break.

    You can see why controls get a bit chunky for very fast down-movement now:
    If you want the object to move down for example every 0.4 seconds, player input will be disabled for 3/15( =0.2 ) seconds every 0.4 seconds; which is 50% of the time.
    Even though this does sound like a lot, the controls are still much better than I would've expected and it's not really a reason to switch to a more complicated grid logic. But try it out yourself.


    I don't know if I'll add this to the level, because it currently integrated in a much bigger network of logic for the puzzle game and I'd have to extract it somehow, as noone would understand what the important part is with all the other stuff right beside it.

    Create your own logic

    An often-overseen feature of LBP2 is the ability to create your own logic. For example, if you made a piece of logic that you think might be handy to re-use later on (like a permanent switch, a timer that goes up and down and is set to directional making everything it is connected to fade in and out, etcetc), then you can create a special kind of chip for it that looks like MM's own logic.

    How? First, turn the Angle Snap to 90 degrees (it's in your Start Menu). Then place a microchip, put your logic in it, remove the sticker that's on it, sticker it with an icon that fits your logic, then change it's name. You can create inputs by wiring things from outside the chip to the inside of the chip, and outputs by wiring things inside the chip to stuff outside of the chip. Then just delete the wires, and you have your inputs/outputs. You can then name the inputs and outputs by pressing Square on them and editing their names/prompts.
    Now just capture the chip itself, not the material around it (just drag the bounding box around ONLY the chip). The object in your bag is automatically named to the chip's name. Then press Square on your logic and give it a category, like "Logic". You might want to categorize it even further into what it does, for example: "Logic: Player Gates"

    And there you have it!
    Animation Help Here

    Alright, a lot of people wonder how media molecule was able to make those cool animations in their story levels such as the Negativitrons Pink Rays or the labels in Factory of a better tomorrow. Well listen carfully, because I'm going to explain Step by Step on how to do them.

    IMPORTANT : Holograms need a dark backround to be in front of such as a square rubber block behind the holograms, if there isn't a backround then the holograms are hard to see.

    TIP : holograms can be triggered on and off, which means if the holograms trigger is ON it will be showing and if the holograms trigger is OFF then it will be invisible.

    In CREATE mode, when holograms are triggered OFF, they appear Grey, but in PLAY mode, they're invisible. So don't freak out if you have all of these confusing grey holograms. TIP : Use the PREVIEW feature in CREATE mode to see what your holograms will look like in play mode. (Press Start and it should be under the Grid section)

    IMPORTANT : Holograms are able to have STICKERS on them that light up, so it may be wise to do your artwork, take a picture of it, place it on a hologram and Cut-Out the edges.

    Anyways the first thing you need to do is make the different versions of the Holograms that will animate say 1 stickman hologram with his arms up, then the other stickman hologram with his hands down, these are called SPRITES. You can have as many Sprites as you want in your animation.

    The next thing to do is to spread your Sprites apart from eachother, then get a SEQUENCER (In the Advanced Logic Section) then go into its Microchip (press R1 on the sequencer to open the microchip) and place BATTERIES (Basic Logic section) in the Microchip. For every SPRITE you have, you place a BATTERY (2 sprites = 2 batteries on the sequencer).

    The BATTERIES need to be arranged in a matter where one battery triggers after the other. So perhaps you could place them UP, DOWN, UP, DOWN etc. and leave Half a space in between each one.

    Here's an example of how it may look (B's represent Batteries)
    |B B B B |
    | B B B B|

    Next, connect the BATTERY to its proper SPRITE.

    Now edit your Sequencer (Press the Square button) and you are now able to change the SPEED of the animation and whether or not you want it to REPEAT (Toggle the LOOP feature)

    Turn your Sequencer on, Turn Preview on, and Check out your new Animation!

    Hope this helps
    from MasterCreator at LBPcentral

    Various Tutorials

    I made these during the beta but I feel they will be just as helpful in the full game so I thought I'd post them, willing be expanding on request.

    Tutorial One: How To Make A Remote Control Top Down Car

    First of all your gonna want to design your car, it can be whatever shape you like it doesn't really make a difference. Then you need to make two controlinators one set to receive and the other set to transmit place the receiving controlinator on your vehicle and your transmitter on whatever you like. Then put two mover on the receivers circuit board set them both to local space then turn one of them upside down, this will be for your reverse so remember to set the speed to a little slower than the accelerate mover. Then set both to acceleration and deceleration 100% now here's where it a little more complicated.

    If you want to have the car gradually accelerate your gonna need to make two timers set to directional hook these up to the movers. Then set the mover's input action to strength scale if you don't want this effect then disregard the previous paragraph.

    Now you need to make a direction splitter out the Up/Down left stick action and its input then hook the positive side of the splitter to the timer(or just the mover if your going the less complicated way) this makes it so only when you press the stick forward does it accelerate. Now its just some personal preference stuff if you would like pulling your left stick backward to be your reverse input set the negative side of the direction splitter to the timer corresponding to the reverse mover (or just the mover if your going the less complicated way) otherwise hook the button you want to reverse(I use the O button) to the timer. Now if your doing it the more complicated way you need to decide whether when you release the stick you want the vehicle to gradually stop of grind to a halt instantly if you want the later option then you must make 2 not gates and hook one up to the reset on your timers then hook the same input you use to start your timers onto the not gates. Otherwise leave your logic be and the vehicle will gradually slow down, now for steering create a advanced rotator then hook up the right stick's Left/Right output onto the On/Off of the rotator make sure your rotator is set to 100% acceleration and deceleration.

    If you want head lights attach some head lights to your vehicle and then wire them up to a toggle switch then out whatever button you want onto the toggle's input. If you want exhaust fumes make a smoke machine and an OR gate hook up everything related to movement onto your OR gate then attach the or gate to the smoke machine now whenever you move exhaust fumes will come out.

    Now attach a gravity tweaker to your circuit board set the dampening to 99% and then your done with that. Now create two movie cameras set one of them to come on when you enter the controlinator and the other one to come on when a button of your choice is pressed. Now set the one that comes on when you enter the vehicle to unlimited hold time and the other camera to 0.1 second hold time then put the same button you used to turn on the movie camera up to the controlinator itself so you will be ejected from the controlinator when you press this button.
    Just encase you did something wrong here's what it should look like:




    Congratulations you just made you very own top down vehicle

    Tutorial Two: Simple Playable Character(Mage)

    First of all your gonna need to make a sackbot which you can dress-up however you like, after that you need to but a controlinator on the sackbots circuit board you should set the controlinator to receive. This gives you the ability to control a sackbot

    Now you need to make a piece of hologram whatever size you like and a small arrow made of hologram, after you have done that you need to put a microchip onto that piece of hologram. On the microchip you have just placed you need to put an anti gravity tweaker set to 99% dampening, a follower with speed ten the ability to move in/out and up/down and with an acceleration of 100%. This piece of hologram will pose as a cursor depicting where you will shoot your fireballs so it will need to rotate, so you need to put a direction splitter onto the circuit board, a direction combiner and an advanced mover. Plug the direction splitters outputs into the corresponding inputs on the direction combiner then plug the direction combiner into the rotation speed input of the rotator. Now I suggest you use the left/right dpad output from the controlinator (you could use the left/right right stick output) and plug that into the direction splitter's input. Now you have an aiming mechanism

    Now for the bullets place an emitter onto the arrow you made and stick the arrow to the aiming mechanism you made earlier attach R1 onto the emitter and now your character can fire well whatever he likes. Now you just need to add two movie cameras to the sackbots circuit board set one of them to unlimited hold time and the other to 0.1 second hold time. Hook up the power button of the controlinator to the unlimited hold camera and another button of your choice onto the 0.1s camera you will need to hook up the same button onto the eject of the controlinator and your done.

    Variants

    If you want your character to have more than one spell(or action) you need to make another hologram with the same things as you did with the other hologram except this one wont need to rotate also put a gyroscope on the hologram. Now you need to create icons for however many spells your going to have stick these icons onto the hologram. Now make a direction splitter and combiner and place these on a circuit board and place the circuit board where the emitter would normally go. Now plug the direction splitters outputs into the direction combiners inputs like you did earlier. Now create a selector with as many outputs as there are actions plug these outputs into their own individual AND gates also plug R1 into these AND gates, after you've done that connect the AND gates into their own individual emitters. Now to have the holograms light up when you have selected a certain spell you must simply connect selectors output which you used to plug into the AND gate into the hologram and the other outputs into their corresponding holograms. All you have to do now is plug the direction combiner into the selectors cycle outputs input and the Up/Down D-Pad output into the direction splitter.

    I may have done this slightly wrong so message me if your having problems.

    Here is what the finished product should look like:






    Tutorial Three: Top Down Character

    Right so you want to make a top down character first of all you need to make a piece of material(what ever you like)the size of a controlinator I just use a 2x2 thin block on the small grid, so now you've got that you need to place a controlinator on your piece of material. Now if your organised you need to make a circuit board and put a note next to it saying movement...

    Movement: Part 1

    First of all you should make an advanced mover and set it to whatever settings you like then attach your controls to it(to make this brief I'm not gonna say things like what controls I think its pretty self explanatory). Now if you want your character to be able to jump you need to make two timers, two toggle switches, two in/out movers and an OR gate. You need to set one of the timers to 0.1 and the other to 0.2 both should be set to count up. now connect these to the OR gate before I forget you must connect the each timer to its own reset. After that connect the OR gate to each of the toggles, you must set one of the toggles to inverted and leave the other one be now set one of the movers to move to back and the other to move out once. Then connect the inverted toggle to the move to back mover and the other toggle to the other mover. Now for walking sounds first of all make a new microchip it is vital you do this else it won't work then place a battery, timer, selector and two sounds on to your chip connect the battery to the timer, the timer must be set to target time 0.3 leave everything else as it is, connect the timer to its own reset and then connect it to the selectors cycle outputs input after that simply connect an output to each sound object.

    Weapons

    For this you will need an emitter two timers and whatever sound you want to go with the emitter, first place your bullet into the emitter set the velocity to whatever you like and the lifetime to about 5 seconds then connect one of the timers to it. This timer should be set to 0.3s target time and to count up then connect the reset to itself after that connect the other timer to the timer you just made, the new timer should be set to how often you want the player to be able to shoot so if i want the player to have the ability to shoot every 2 seconds I'd set the timer to 2 seconds. You must also set the timer to count down then connect the R1 button to the timer's input.

    Structure

    Now you need to make an extension of the controlinator make this however long you like and in a rectangular shape on the end of the shape create a cross-hair of whatever design you like. This is to show the player where they are going to shoot.

    Movement: Part 2

    Now you have made this extension of the controlinator you can add the rotation part of the character place a joystick mover in the middle of the cross-hair now your character will face in the direction the stick is pointing.

    Don't forget you need to place a gravity tweaker on your character to prevent it from falling.

    Tada you've completed your very own basic top-down character

    Sub Tutorial: Top Down Basic Attacking AI

    First of all you need to place a block whatever size you like and it can be decorated in any way it will not affect your enemy character, now onto the logic...

    First of all build a microchip and place a tag sensor on it this will serve as the detection radius for the enemy character, you then need to connect that tag sensor to a look at rotator. Then make a follower with the same detection radius as the tag sensor allow Up/Down movement and In/Out movement and set the speed to however fast you want. Then put down an impact sensor which includes touching, connect this to a counter and an AND gate. You then must set the counter to target count 1 and connect it to the on/off input of a microchip, now duplicate the impact sensor you made earlier and put it on this microchip, then attach it to the AND gate. After that connect the AND gate to a destroyer and a score giver, so now you should have a character that moves towards your character and blows up giving however many points you like after two hits. Now if you want it to be able to attack place an emitter on the microchip and connect the tag sensor to it. Now just put an anti-gravity tweaker on it and your good to go, just remember you need to put a tag the same colour as the tag sensor on your character(the one you play as) and place a tag the same colour as your impact sensor on your bullet.
    how to make a scoreboard. thanks to TjoxYorro

    Scoreboard Tutorial

    Hi there to all!

    In this tutorial i will explain how to make a scoreboard, using some easy logic. You'll have to pay some attention, so you won't mix things up.

    First you'll need to create a dark background, otherwise you'll have trouble with seeing your hologram material. Yes, you'll
    have to create the numbers with holographic material (for later on) about 2 small grid away from eachother. Make sure a number isn't split in different parts. We want to make a scoreboard from 0-10.
    Go on! Make those numbers!

    Small list of used abbreviations:
    X/O = X-Or Gate
    MC = Microchip
    Counter x/x - First x = Amount of counts it is on.
    - 2nd x = Max amount of counts before it activates

    Now add a MC somewhere close to your set of numbers (not on one of them). Open up, and make it pretty big.

    Add a counter 0/1 a ANTI-gate and a X/O. The Anti gate will be the zero. Hook up the counter 0/1 to the ANTI-gate and the
    X/O. Connect the output of the ANTI gate with Zero (the zero should be lit) and connect the output of the X/O with One.
    Now add 9 more counters 0/x, with x representing the hologram number. Now add a X/O gate behind each counter.
    Now you'll have to pay attention:

    Take the output of your counter 0/2 and connect it with the X/O gate BEHIND COUNTER 0/1 and the X/O gate next to you.
    It should look like this:



    Now you have to repeat this step for every number: Counter output into the X/O input next to the previous counter, and
    into the X/O input next to the counter.

    Connect the output of a X/O gate to the number it represents. This number is the max counter number of the counter left
    from it.

    I should look like this when it is done. You only have to connect the activation point (Button in my case) to
    every counters input. Watch closely that you dont accidently connect it to the counter reset. (I didn't draw this because
    it's already messy this way).



    Now you actually have a counter with numbers.. But that is not what we are aiming for. Close your MC. Make another
    piece of black background. What you now have to do is place all numbers in eachother (don't glue). In play mode,
    only 1 number will be visible at a time.

    transfer the microchip from the big black background to the new background. Go to play mode and test if it works. Then go
    back to create. Now open your MC again, and place a switch on the ground (2-way). Connect the switch output to every
    counters 'reset' input. once this is done, close your microchip.
    Now select:
    Button
    Switch
    Background (MC on it)
    The stacked numbers

    And duplicate it. Now somewhere next to your first set of numbers. And here is your scoreboard.



    Extra:
    You can also connect each X/O output to a [single] scoregiver.
    Optionally, you can connect your last counter (counter 0/10) to a game ender, to end a game at a maximum score.

    All of this, thanks to my awesome painting skills :3

    EDIT: I made a level around my scoreboard: You'll get a half scoreboard as price, and you'll only need to duplicate it and change the input. (notes are on the MC about how to change it to your liking). lbp.me
    The game is a sort-off basketball, recommended for 2-4 players.
    Thanks to tdarb over at LBPcentral. a variation on the counter

    Update I have included the new version of this into a level on LBP2 (http://lbp.me/v/x94vgt). It now will not roll over 9 on the highest digit (eg 999), and it will not go below 0. If you want to use it without that logic, just run your up down input directly to the counter cycle, and chain the other digits the same way. This will bypass the logic for not allowing rollover. I'll update this tomorrow to show how the new logic works.



    What it does
    This is a single digit that allows you to either set the value directly, or add or subtract values. It can be used individually or you can chain groups of them together via the single input/output to create any size number you choose. These numbers can be controlled through a single input, set directly, or added to or subtracted from. Actually quite useful.

    How it was done

    The first step is making your display. Set your grid to small. Now use holo material in the circle shape. Flatten this out to a flat layer and one square in size. Now make a bar that is one grid square high and ten wide.

    Use the holo material again and set the display brightness to 0. While still on small grid, choose a square shape and flatten it. This time you want a shape about 14 wide and 25 tall. If it is a little larger that is fine. You can always trim it later.

    Now take your holo bar and set the ON color to whatever color you want it to display when on. Duplicate the bar using L3 and cut out where the parts of your digit will display on your holo rectangle and then paste a duplicate in there. Once you have done that select your transparent material and glue it all together.

    Ok, now place an Anti-Gravity Tweaker on the non display part of your digit to keep it in place. Also place a microchip on the non display portion of your digit.

    When you are done you should have something similar to this


    Note:This is displaying a 0, at this point yours probably looks more like an 8.


    Making the Logic

    Open your microchip and choose an OR gate. Set it to have 10 inputs, and place 7 of them on your microchip in the same figure 8 that your digit displays in. This makes it easier for assigning inputs and outputs later.

    Below that, place a single selector with 10 input/outputs.

    Now take your OR outputs and attache them to the corresponding holo material for each part of the display.

    Use the outputs from your Selector to make your digits. For example, output 1 will make the 0, so take the output from the 1 node and attach it to the corresponding input on each of the OR gates on the outside of your pattern so that when the first node on the Selector is active, your holo display lights up a zero. Continue to do the same for each node/digit.


    NOTE: I set mine up so that each of the inputs for the OR switches corresponds to a given number. The ones on the left and bottom for 0, next for 1, and on up. This does leave some gaps, but it makes adjustments easier if you mess up a number. Plus it makes the microchip look a lot cleaner.

    Ok, at this point take a second and pat yourself on the back! You now have a completely functional digital counter. Go ahead and hook a switch up to the Cycle input of your selector and test it out. Try hooking two switches through a direction combiner. Pretty snazzy huh? We're not done just yet.

    Now add a microchip onto your main one just to the left of your selector and open it up (You probably noticed that in the picture above). Now on the microchip place two OR gates, two counters set to count to 1, two AND gates, and a single direction combiner as shown below.



    The outputs of each OR gate should be attached to the reset input of their neighboring counter.

    From top to bottom connect the outputs of your main selector as follows.

    Top OR gate should be attached to "Selecter Output:#9"
    Top counter should be attached to "Selector Output:#10"

    Bottom counter should be attached to "Selector Output:#1"
    Bottom OR gate should be attached to "Selector Output:#2"

    Connect your counter outputs to the AND gate directly to the right.
    Top AND should have the remaining input attached to "Selector Output:#1"
    Bottom AND should have the remaining input attached to "Selector Output:#10"

    Connect the AND gates to their corresponding poles in the combiner and their corresponding OR gate (top to top, bottom to bottom) .

    Now we're DONE!!!

    Now close all of your chips and duplicate the whole digit and place a copy of it to the left of the original. Open the chips on the right digit one more time, and connect the output from your combiner on the inside chip to the cycle input on selector on the chip to the left. Now every time the chip on the right rolls over from 9-0, or 0-9, the chip on the left will behave accordingly. You could attach another chip to the one on the left if you want. You can keep doing it to create a number as large as you like.


    PS-This counter only works with positive numbers ATM. If you roll back below 0 it will go to 99 (or 999 or 9999). I didn't include the logic to keep from going below 0 because I wanted all the numbers to be identical and it is only needed on the very first number. Doing that is fairly easy though with a counter and a NOT gate. If there is interest I will add that part to the tutorial.
    thanks to EliminatorZigma over at LBPcentral

    Direction Inverter

    Pretty simple, but in case anyone hasn't figured this out yet, here's how to make a piece of logic that will invert direction inputs (right goes left, up goes down, etc).

    1) Place a direction splitter and a direction combiner on a microchip
    2) Connect the positive output of the direction splitter to the negative input of the direction combiner
    3) Connect the negative output of the direction splitter to the positive input of the direction combiner
    4) The output of the direction combiner now inverts the directions!

    Good for a different style of gameplay, fancy machines, or a negative effect in a versus game!
    by Bremnen over at LBPcentral

    Sackbot A.I and LogicTutorials


    Just thought I would make this thread for people who might be having trouble/want to get more out of sackbots.

    I'm going to use MC instead of MicroChip simply because it gets tedious having to keep typing it.
    Also, DCS = Controllinator for those that don't already know.

    A.I

    Basic A.I - Sackboy controls
     
    You'll see me using a lot of MicroChips, that's to keep it neat, I suggest you do it too.
    First open up the sackbot and place 7 MCs inside, seperating one from the others is a good idea. In the one that you seperated place 7 Tag Sensors.
    It's a good idea to keep them all the same color.
    Name the Tag Sensors:
    Left
    Right
    Jump
    Mini Jump
    Grab
    Let Go

    Then hook the top four to each their own MC and put a DCS in them. (The reason to hook them into the MC is so you can turn the DCS on/off which is the most important thing in Sackbot A.I)
    At this point I advise labeling the MCs and putting a note with the label inside of them

    For Left and Right put a battery in the DCS of that MC set to -100(Left) or 100%(Right) and connect it to the left/right input of the left stick.

    For jump you would go in and put a battery then connect it to X.
    For Mini Jump you'll need a timer set to .1 Target Time and Current time, an Anti-Gravity Object Tweaker set to 0% Anti-Gravity and 30% Dampening, also an impact sensor.
    Hook up the Tag Sensor labeled Mini Jump into the timer, the timer into the Anti-Grav, and the Impact sensor into the reset of the timer. The timer also needs to be hooked into the X of the DCS in that MC.

    Alright, for the last 2, Let Go and Grab, You need an AND gate with an inverted output and a NOT gate with a non-inverted output.
    Hook the Let Go tag sensor into the AND gate
    Hook the Grab tag sensor into the NOT gate then the NOT gate into the other input on the AND gate.
    Hook the AND gets output into the Grab MC.

    Put a DCS in the Grab MC with a Battery connected to R1.

    I think there might be an extra wire in that last pic..

    For Emotions, put more Tag Sensors, connect them to Sackbot Behaviour chips set to the desired emotion
    Then connect the Tag Sensors to an OR gate with however many emotion Tag Sensors you have, and connect the OR gate to a NOT gate.
    Hook the NOT gate up to a behaviour chip set to Neutral. (Or any other emotion you want to revert to when an emotion tag is not in range)

    Now to activate any of these actions, simply place a Tag with the corresponding color and name of the Tag Sensor that has the action you would like to use next to the Sackbot. If I explained it well enough for you to understand)
    You can use a Sequencer to operate many actions in a row by placing the Tags to the corresponding action in the Sequencer and Turning the Radius of the Tag Sensor up enough so that the Sackbot can register it. Tags cannot operate Tag Sensors when they are both inside the Sackbot, so be sure to put the Sequencer out, but close-by.

    Using Recorded Actions to Control Sackbots/Switching between Sackbot Recordings
     
    You need:
    A Sackbot sitting in a DCS for every recording, obviously.
    A DCS in a MicroChip, inside of the Sackbot you want to be controlled, for every recording.
    A Toggle switch and an inverted OR gate, or a Selector.

    You need to go into the Sackbots sitting in the DCS's and hook the outputs of all the buttons used in that recording, into the inputs of the same buttons on a DCS in the Sackbot you want to control, do this for each recording sackbot so that you have the outputs going into the inputs of a DCS for each recording.

    Hook the Toggle into the inverted OR gate and into the ON/OFF of one of the DCS MCs.
    Hook the Inverted OR gate into the other MCs On/Off.
    Or if you are using a selector, Hook the Toggle into the Cycle input on the bottom, and the Outputs into the On/Offs of the MicroChips.

    Inter-Sackbot AI- Courtesy of lionhart180
     
    Inter-Sackbot AI
    Here's how to set up interactions amongst different sackbots, for example lets say you want to make 2 different types of sackbots, friendly and enemies, the enemies flee from you, the friendlies follow you, and the enemies and friendlys attack each other. It's much easier than you think.

    I apologize for not having any pictures to explain this at the moment but it is pretty easy to do.

    First make your two sackbots, and set them a bit of a ways away from each other. Customize them to run like sack people, and give the friendly, lets call him Jack, a bit of a grin. Next make them both afraid of heights and danger, but able to jump and change planes. Finally dress them up to look the parts.

    Next, open up Jacks MC and stick a green key in there. This will now make all of Jack associated as a green tag. Do the same for the Enemy but give him a red tag.

    Let's start with Jacks AI. Let's look at all possible inputs. A: Nothing, no one is around. Let's make him idle while this is happening. Next you are nearby, so he follows you. Third, an enemy is close by, so he charges in and attacks. And fourth, BOTH you and an enemy are nearby, so who takes precedence? Let's give it to the enemy.

    Ok so all we need is a 3 way selector switch, 3 inputs and outputs. Smack that in the middle. Here are your inputs:

    #1 Battery
    #2 Sackperson Proximity Switch
    #3 Red Tag Sensor Switch

    As for outputs, set all three to hook up to 3 different sackbot AI chips.

    #1: Make him stand idle, looking around. Hook him up to look at, say, purple tags. These will be objects of interest in your level (moving doors, moving objects, sounds, etc) this adds a more realistic feel to your sackperson so he glances around at his surroundings.

    #2 Basically same set up but instead of idle he is now set to follow your sackperson. However set his awareness to be about twice that of the distance of the trigger for the proximity switch. Why? You'll need to get up close if you lose track of him, but once he's following you you can go farther away and he won't get lost.

    #3 Set this one to follow tagged waypoint, red, as well as aggressive. Second, set his facial expression to angry. Third, set him to look at tags, red, so he's not only angry, but angry and looking at the enemy he's angry at.

    Viola, your sackperson should now chill out til you land, to which he follow you pleasantly, but then abruptly takes off and glares angrily at the enemy if you get too close.

    Next: The enemy AI. This one is way trickier because we want the enemy to do a lot more stuff.

    First, when he is idle lets set him to patrol, BUT we want to control our enemy's patrol path, so when he reaches a colored tag he turns around and goes the oppisite direction, this is easy, just set it to toggle between left or right walking.

    Second, we want him to not continuously walk, we want him to pause for 3-4 seconds and look around when he reaches another type of colored tag. This will require timers, resets, and a bunch of other complicated stuff.

    Third, we want him to attack the friendly NPC upon spotting him.

    And fourth, we want him to run away while attacking the player if he spots the player, taking precedence over killing the NPC.

    Whew, thats kind of complicated, but lets see what we can do. First, we need pretty much the same set up for the friendly, but 5 inputs. These are:

    #1 Battery
    #2 Blue Tag Switch (NPC sighted!)
    #3 Player Proximity (Run away!)

    Ok already its looking a bit tricky but lets start with the easy stuff. First hook up the #2 and #3 outputs to their respective AIs directly, #2 being the same as the friendly's aggression towards enemy AI accept towards a blue tag instead of red.

    Second #3 will be set to flee, aggressive. Maybe add a scared face for extra measure.

    Ok, so now to set his patrol path. First we'll build the necessary AIs on the right, both patrolling at about 70% speed, walking, one left handed and one right handed.

    So what we need to do is hook up to and switches, one to each of those AIs. Have their top inputs be the #1 output from your first selector switch. Next hook up a toggler, and have its input be a orange or whatever tag switch, these will swap the path of the bot. Set its output to both #2s of the and switches.

    Now whenever no one is around, the sackbot will strut left or right until he hits an orange tag, to which he'll promptly turn around and walk the other way. Now we can directly control the sackbots patrol!

    Now to make him pause at purple tags, this is tricky. First add a purple tag detector to this conglomeration of AI, near the pathing section of your AI.

    Break both of the connections between the AND->AI connections, and stick a 2IO selector in each one. Remake the connections, but going through the #1 input and outputs of the respective selectors. If you exit out, the sackbot still works exactly the same, but now we've added the ability to temporarily break the connection to the pathing AIs.

    Build your last AI MC, set this to having the sackbot idle, looking around, and looking at purple tags. Maybe make him frown harder or something.

    Next, hook up BOTH #2 outputs of the selectors to this last AI.

    Now remember that purple tag switch we made earlier? We'll want to hook that up to a timer, maybe 4 seconds long. Next we'll hook that timer up to both #2 inputs of the selectors.

    Set the output of the timer to be opposite, so it turns off when full (NPC is done looking around). But now we have a problem! Because its perma on, the NPC just stands there like a stone, so we need to also verify that he is near a purple switch, but not done looking at it.

    Break the connection between the timer and the selector, and put an AND switch between them, so now its (not)Timer -> AND -> Selector I2

    Next hook up the other input of that AND switch to be the purple tag switch we made awhile ago. There, now he only stands still when hes at a purple tag AND his timer isn't full.

    But now when he keeps walking, if he hits a new purple tag his timer is already filled up! We need a way to reset it to 0! Ok that's actually really easy, and it's the last step.

    Make a NOT gate, and feed the purple tag switch into it. Feed it's output into the reset input of the timer on the bottom.

    Viola, once the sackbot walks away from the purple gate it resets the timer.

    Try building a path for him to walk and patrol along to see it in action. Then copy him and the friendly npc, give them both creatinators and watch them attack each other!

    Hope you enjoyed the tutorial, I'm a second year computer scientist so all of this stuff is fun and easy for me, so if anyone has any more questions or how-tos for logic gates, especially AI, feel free to ask and I'll be glad to help you figure out how to make your sackbots or whatever do what you want them to do!

    Tutorial #2: Bringing your Sackbot to Life! - Courtesy of lionhart180
     

    Tutoriual #2: Bringing your Sackbot to Life!
    Here's a few useful things you might want to add to your bots to make them feel less like scenery and more like sentient helpers in your level.

    Impact Sensor -> Sackbot soundclip : Grunt
    This will make your sackbot grunt every time he lands on the ground, hits something, etc.

    Projectile Sensor -> Sackbot soundclip : Disgusted
    This is a nice addition for when you have the creatinator in your level, if you accidently shoot your friendly sackbot he'll shake his head and grumble at you!

    Player Sensor (very close proximity) -> Sackbot soundclip : Greeting + AI action (wave motion)
    This will make your sackbot stop following you and wave a short greeting when he gets up to you.

    Colored tag Switch (medium proximity) -> Sackbot soundclip : query. Also set AI to look at waypoints of the same color
    This will make your sackbot look at the switch and go "heh?" when he sees it. Stick these colored tags on any object of interest in your levels, switches, enemies, etc. It's a good way also to help guide the player subtly in your levels.

    Grab Sensor -> Sackbot Soundclip : query.
    Same idea as the previous tip, this one makes your sackbot make a confused sound when the player grabs onto him and tugs him around.

    The list goes on, but these little tweaks are excellent ways to really make your sackbots stick out in your levels.

    My A.I so far:
     
    This is your brain


    This is your brain on me.


    The first pic is Basic Actions and Emotions
    The second pic is Medium 2 and 3 layered Actions.
    This is all A.I stuff, stuff that a regular Sackboy can do when being controlled by a player. So basically, it's Sackboy in a Microchip.
    Im sorry, the logic is in another chip.
    It's messy because I rearranged it to fit on screen.
    I think I have about 40 something Actions. Every Action is activated by a single Tag. Even the combinations of actions.
    I promise it's not as hard as it might look.

    Logic
    Controlled by Player
    By Controlled by Player I mean the player controlls the Sackbot remotely using DCS.
    How to Control a Sackbot using a DCS
     
    Place a DCS for Sackboy to sit in anywhere you like, set it to transmit, place another DCS inside the Sackbot set to recieve.

    Flying
     
    Flying is one of the easiest and basic things you can do with a Sackbot.
    You'll need:
    AND Gate
    OR Gate
    Advanced Mover
    Joystick Rotator
    Anti Gravity Object Tweaker (Set Dampening to about 40%)

    It's good to use a button to activate flying, I personally prefer to use L1 to activate things to i'll that as an example.
    Hook L1 into the AND Gate
    Hook both the Left/Right and Up/Down Outputs of the Left Stick into the OR Gate, then plug the output of the OR Gate into the AND Gate.
    Also hook the Left/Right and Up/Down outputs of the Left Stick into the Advanced Mover and the Joystick rotator.
    Take the AND gate output and plug that into the On/Off input on the bottom of the Advanced Mover.
    Lastly, Hook L1 into the Anti Gravity Object Tweaker so that you don't fall out of the Air.

    Sackbot Follow Cam
     

    This is easy,
    Put the DCS that you want Sackboy to sit in on a peice of Holo with Brightness at 0% and turn visible in playmode off in the DCS.
    Put a Follow in the DCS set to max Speed and Follow Tag.
    Simply put a Tag the same color/name of the Follower and it should follow.

    You could also use a Movie Cam but be aware that it forces all players to view that cam so if you want all players to have their own cam, it would probably be better to use the above method.

    Aiming Emitted Objects/Shooting
     

    Ever wonder how that RPG level with the Bow was made?
    Easy:
    The object being emitted(in this case holo) needs to have
    DCS set to recieve
    a follower set to follow a tag on Sackbot(Max speed and Acceleration),
    (NOTE: This Emitter is only if the Object will be shooting something)An Emitter, set to 0.0 Frequency(Preferably), and 1s or less Lifetime(Preferably), Infinite emitted, Max emitted at once is whatever you want.
    A Joystick Rotator at Max Acceleration
    A Tag Sensor set to a tag on Sackbot.
    And a Destroyer
    Whatever button you use to shoot (If you choose to) gets hooked into the Emitter, Left/Right Output from Right Stick goes into Input of JoyStick Rotator, Up/Down Output of Right Stick goes into Input of Joystick Rotator. Then hook the Tag Sensor into the Destroyer.

    In your Sackbot, put a DCS set to Transmit the same color as the DCS on the object, a Direction Combiner, an Emitter, an OR gate, an inverted NOT gate, and a Tag the same color/name of the Tag Sensor on the object.
    The Emitter needs to be 0 Linear/Angular velocity, 0.0 Frequency, Infinite Lifetime, Infinite Emitted, Max Emitted at once 1, and Destroy Oldest when Max reached Off.
    Hook both outputs of the Right Stick into the Signal Combiner and the OR gate, the Output of the Combiner into the Emitter, the Output of the OR gate into the NOT gate, and the Output of the NOT gate, into the Tag.

    If you are going to make a flamethrower of some other hazard shoot out, I advise Hologram 0% brightness then lethalized, so it looks more realistic than cylindrical blocks flying out.

    Levitating Objects using Sackbot
     

    To [strike]become a Jedi[/strike] levitate objects, put a DCS set to Transmit and a Tag inside of your sackbot.
    On what you are levitating put a DCS with an Advanced Mover, OR gate, 3 input AND gate, Anti Gravity Object Tweaker set to 40% Dampening and a Tag Sensor.
    Choose a button, L1 for this example, and hook it up to the AND gate and Anti Gravity tweaker. Hook the Tag Sensor into the third input of the AND gate.
    Wire the Outputs for the Left Stick in the DCS to the OR Gate and Advanced Mover, respectively. The Output of the AND Gate goes into the On/Off input of the Advanced Mover.

    May the [strike]Force[/strike] Logic be with you.

    Force Waves/Shields
     

    Make something to emit, I suggest Holo, and put a Tag on colored/labeled whatever you want. (Make sure it doesn't interfere with any of your other Tag Sensors)
    Save your "Force Waves" and put a DCS with emitter into your Sackbot, set to emit your object.

    On whatever you want it to push put a Follower set to Flee and Allow Up/Down Movement and an Impact Sensor set to the Color/Label of the Tag in your Sackbot. Turn Include Touching and Require Tag, on.

    Shields are the same, just put the Tag from the Waves on a peice of Holo set to follow a Tag on your Sackbot and the Holo to .1% Brightness. (NOTE: I haven't used this exact method for shields, mine was more complex so I could put more logic in, so if this doesn't work tell me and I'll put a different way)

    Wall Running
     
    Needed:
    Impact sensor
    Advanced Mover
    Gyroscope
    Anti Gravity Object Tweaker
    Set the Impact sensor to Include Touching and Require Tag, Yes.
    Set the Gyroscop to 100% Acceleration
    Set the Advanced Mover to whatever you like(If you are using a Sackbot, I reccomend 3.0) and 100% Strength
    Turn the Dampening on the Gravity tweaker to 40%
    Hook up the Impact sensor to the Gyroscope, Anti Gravity Object Tweaker and the ON/OFF input of the Advanced Mover
    Hook the Up/Down Output from the Left Stick to the Up/Down Input of the Advanced Mover

    Now to be able to climb a wall, surround it with one peice of Holo and put a Tag with the same color/label of the Impact Sensor.

    How to make checkpoint system for sackbot that is controlled by Player- Courtesy of waD_Delma
     

    First you want to make checkpoint from thin material or anything you want.
    Create microchip and place it to the checkpoint.
    Place selector with two inputs in the microchip.
    Create tag sensor that detects tag "active" with max radius and hook it to first input of selector.
    Create tag sensor that detects when player activates the checkpoint and hook it second input of selector.
    Hook second output of selector to tag with label "active".
    Create MC inside the microchip and hook second output of the selector to activate input of that MC.
    Create tag with label "active" inside the MC.
    Create tag sensor inside MC that detects player with max radius and invert it.
    Place emitter that emits new sackbot and hook sensor that detects player with max radius to it.
    Thanks to lionhart180 over at LBPcentral

    Binary Logic: You're Key for Awesome!

    Ok so lot's of people are having problems with logic, and I can understand its a bit of a benign concept that can be hard to wrap your head around.

    Ok so first off, whats a boolean, or binary? Simply put, it stands for dual values. Everything in boolean logic has one of two values, on, or off. Represented by 0 or 1.

    Now when it comes to lbp sometimes your boolean values can be special, instead of on/off they get transformed into left/right, IE winches and etc.

    Now logic gates are special switches that take in a bunch of inputs, and pump out an output based on the inputs. If you recall highschool math this is called a function, turning multiple inputs into one output. Think of it like a machine you feed a bunch of things into and it pumps out a single answer.

    There are a few primary logic gates in LBP. OR, AND, and XOR. Also there is NOT but thats kind of not the same as it only ever has one input.

    First off is the simplest gate, NOT. Not flops the input into it. If you input 1, it outputs 0, and vise versa. The best representation of a logic gate is via something called a Truth Table. This is a representation of all possible inputs and their outputs.

    For example, here's the truth table for NOT

    IN OUT
    0 1
    1 0

    Often for logic functions/gates, the inputs are represented by variables, generally p, q, r, and s. Others are a, b, c, and d. etc etc it doesn't matter. The ones to avoid are v, o, l, x, and i. Simply put, these letters can be mistaken for variables/symbols used in logic.

    Next up is the AND gate. This gate is pretty simple. Our LBP2 AND gates take in a lot of possible inputs, with a minimum of 2. The AND gate only ever outputs true when every single input is one. If even one is off it will output 0, off.

    Lets make the simple truth table for AND with 2 inputs.

    s q OUT
    0 0 0
    0 1 0
    1 0 0
    1 1 1

    Next up is OR, this is basically a connector for lines. It lets you combine multiple inputs together to control one thing, but has other uses as well. Essentially if even just one input is one, or even all of them, it outputs true. The only time it outputs false is when every single output is off.

    s q OUT
    0 0 0
    0 1 1
    1 0 1
    1 1 1

    Finally we have the XOR gate. It's a special version of the OR gate in that it only outputs true when... ok wait hold on er...

    Ok normally XOR gates are only ever 2 inputs so in all honesty, I have no clue if LBP2 only outputs 1 when only 1 input is one, or all but 1 input is one... so uh... let's stick with 2 outputs for now and you guys all have homework to go mess around with the XOR gate to find out what does what, ok? Besides experimenting is what LBP is all about, am I right?

    Basically XOR is a one or the other gate, but not both. If one input is on it outputs true, but if none of them or both of them are on, it outputs false.

    s q OUT
    0 0 0
    0 1 1
    1 0 1
    1 1 0

    Now on the forums I personally suggest we all use the accepted mathematical symbols for logic gates

    NOT : ~
    AND : ^
    OR : v
    XOR : X
    The actual symbol for XOR is a cross in a circle but thats hard to type, so Xx is easier.

    Finally lets go back to the NOT symbol, as it has a neat little property. If you apply the not gate to any of the other logic gates it flips their values, making them the opposite of their use. Commonly this is represented by putting the letter N before their name, NAND, NOR, XNOR, etc.

    Whats awesome in LBP2 is you don't even need to use the not gate, as each of the other 3 logic gates has the NOT gate built right into them as a toggleable value, just hit square over your gate and select the not toggle on them to stick an invisible NOT gate right after them. Yay for MMM being awesome!

    Let's see the effects of not on the main gates.

    NAND makes your gate output true when ever one or more inputs are off. It's like a reverse OR gate!

    NOR outputs true when everything is off! Neat!

    XNOR becomes a very special, highly valued logic gate, as a test let's look at it's truth table and you can guess what it's name is.

    s q OUT
    0 0 1
    0 1 0
    1 0 0
    1 1 1

    This is an awesome way to verify that both inputs are the same, either off or on.

    Next let's cover some basic practice for making your logic in LBP easy to use.

    First off, name everything! First and foremost your microchips. Give them a good name that shows what they do. In 3 months if you come back to your level and look at your logic, if there's more than 4 logic gates in it you probably will have 0 clue how it works, or even what it does.

    Second, you can name your inputs and outputs too! To add an input to your gate when you don't have something to connect yet, stick a battery outside the MC and grab its wire and attach it to the inputted gate in your MC, then break the connection. Now if you minimize your MC you'll see an input on its left side, neat! But it gets cooler!

    Maximize it again and hover over the input, where the glowing triangle gets big and hit the edit button. Lo and behold, you can edit the name of said input, and if I recall correctly you can apply a not value to it too. Whoa!

    Name it and then minimize your MC. Grab your battery and hover the wire over the input. Look at that, the name of that input now shows up. This is an extremely important thing to do to keep your MCs user friendly. A well made MC won't need the user to even maximize it up to figure out what connects to what, and they'll be able to hook it up with ease!

    The same goes for outputs, once you establish an output connection the same way (hook a gate up to something outside and then break the outer connection to make a static output) you can then hover over it and edit it, and thus name the output so the user knows what value comes out.

    MMM is pretty awesome, /golfclap

    Now let's do one last tweak to make your MC even more user friendly. If you've noticed that hooking two different inputs or outputs to gates that are close to each other, the lines for the outputs are really close to each other. It's actually pretty easy to separate them farther apart and evenly space them!

    Instead of directly hooking up the gate to the outer input of your MC, grab the wire and click just inside of your mc where you want your wire going out. This should stick down one of those little circles with an arrow that represent a continuation of the line. Then grab the output of THAT little circle and put THAT to the output. This allows you to force the outputs to be farther spaced apart, letting your MC become even more user friendly. Alright!

    In short:
    AND = All inputs must be active for it to activate.
    OR = One or all inputs Must be active for it to activate.
    XOR = Only activates if one input is active and not if more than one or none are active.
    NOT = Gates are backwards, for instance:
    NAND = Activates when none or one input is active.
    NOR = Activates when no inputs are active.
    XNOR = Activates when no or at least more than one inputs are active.
    (NOT has many many uses depending on the situation, fo instance, when you have a cable connected to various objects and want one to be reversed of how the other one is, instead of having to make a whole new system, you can just attatch one of the wires to a NOT gate and it'll all work. )

    - Microchips can and should be named.
    - Inputs and outputs can be named.
    - Wires can be re-stablished and re-organised by setting them on nothing 1st then connecting the new input that was just made to the switch/ gate, these inputs can also be named as well.

    Next up will be complex logic gates, like Toggle and split/combine. To be honest I'm not very fluent with the splitter and combiner so I'm going to experiment a lot with it before I post a tutorial on it.

    Hope you enjoy, post any questions you want and I'll try to answer!


    ---------- Post added at 11:03 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:48 PM ----------

    Last edited by cliffbo; 02-13-2011 at 07:36 PM.

  5. #5
    PSN: GribbleGrunger cliffbo's Avatar
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    why not discuss LBP2 in this thread? the idea was to try and find relevant information for whatever people are talking about. i keep having to browse through the other thread and then post in here. plus it means i will have to keep bumping this thread regularly

    ---------- Post added at 03:48 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:51 PM ----------

    things MM needs to add to LBP2:

    selectable idle animations
    climbing
    crawling
    adjustable glow on Holographic materials from 0 to 100
    hand over hand while hanging
    screen filters such as rain, snow, underwater and mist. all adjustable
    sound effects usable in music creator (i'm assuming they aren't because i've not heard any music using them yet)
    video effects such as thinking back, sliding across, a shrinking circle for focusing attention on particular events
    think bubbles, shout bubbles
    adjustable score numbers: different fonts and sizes

    ---------- Post added at 05:17 PM ---------- Previous post was at 03:48 PM ----------

    by the way, the grid tutorial is written by the guy who made the calculator! Shiwayari

    Thanks to Von ever at LBPcentral

    how to make a duel control system. pressing a button multiple times makes sackboy shoot differently



    X goes into the Or Gate,then into what you want to emit on the first press.
    It goes into the blue counter,that is set at 2 (for the second press)
    Then into the bottom timer (count up) and dictates how quick you need to input the second button press.if you don't do it in time,it resets itself,and the counter.
    The counter is wired into the AND Gate,and activates the second timer (count down) that resets the counter,and fires the second emitter on the second press.

    I did have issues with it a first as quick presses of x locked it up,but setting the top timer to 0.1sec fixed it.

    You could probably get rid of the And Gate,like I said it was the first thing I made,and I'm not sure why it's there
    Thanks to lionhart180 over at LBPcentral

    Multi sackbot controller

    I just built a multi sackbot control system, though I'm 99.9% there is a WAY easier way to do it if I can figure out how to disable the control of a remote control receiver so it doesn't listen for inputs.

    The set up is... ok well not simple in the slightest at all sadly. First off I created your standard nonvisible nonescapable controller. I then stuck a 4 out selector.

    Next I ran the "is being used" output of the controller alongside it's left/right button output through an AND gate, which I hooked up to the cycling of the selector. Thus whenever the player hit left or right on the controller they could cycle through the outputs.

    Next I created a sackbot and gave him a controller inside to receive from the player. This is where it gets tricky, but essentially I created 4 sackbots with inputs for all the buttons I need to press that turned on when said buttons where pushed, which were attached to their own AND gates, all of which were checked against if the player had cycled to them via the selector.

    All the ANd gates outputed to their said buttons on each sackbot's controller, thus when I hit left all 4 sackbots got a left command, but only the one that was selected via the selector had it pass through his respective AND gate and pass to his controller.

    I also hooked up each sackbot with a camera that focused on them, which was activated when they were selected.

    The result was the ability to have 4 sackbots you could "cycle" control through, thus controlling 4 sackbots at once.

    That took me about an hour, so then I rolled up my sleeves and decided to get down to some real business.

    First off I wanted the ability to tell a sackbot to grab something, and then hit a button to make him keep grabbing while I controlled a different sackbot.

    So I used L1, and passed it through a 3 input AND gate. Input 1 was if he was selected, input 2 was the output of the R1s AND gate, and the third Input was of course, player's L1.

    Thus if the sackbot was selected, and R1 was down, if the player tapped L1 as well it'd pulse true.

    I outputted this to a toggle gate. I then broke the connection between the R1's AND gate and the R1 button for the sackbot and put an OR gate between them and rebuilt the connection through it, and made the output of the toggle switch the other input of the OR.

    Thus, if the sackbot is grabbing something, if you hit L1 you can let go and he'll stay grabbing while you do other stuff, whoot!

    Next I wanted the ability to have the sackbot you are controlling be able to "summon" the other three to follow you.

    This was surprisingly easy, I used L3 for that input. Just wired that, once again, through an AND gate like the rest, checked against if he is in control. I set that up to a toggle, which turned on a green tag (and some other visual aesthetic stuff, sound effects, etc)

    I then added a switch detector for the same green switch, to detect it on one of the other three sackbots, and told that to turn on a follow waypoint AI when on, and when not on turn on normal idle AI.

    I also set that to check if the R1 grab toggle was on and turn it off, so if you call the sackbots and one is grabbing something, he'll let go and come to.

    Finally I set the leadership toggle, as I called it, to check through an ANd gate if it is on and the sackbot is not in control, if so, turn itself off.

    The final result was pretty neat, but now I have a new puzzle to work on.

    I'm building a level around these sackbots, but clearly as is if one died you'd be screwed as sackbots don't respawn.

    I cannot simply emit the sackbots, as the AI requires them to be connected to the main controller.

    I'm thinking of having 4 of each bot, 3/4 of them in stasis, at a main area to be shot through some tubes to a waypoint that will be activated by the player, when one sacbkot dies, one of his replacements gets shot through the tubs and lands at the last activated waypoints.
    thanks to SackbotInc over at LBPcentral

    Different Checkpoint system

    1 Selector with x ports
    1 Tag Switch
    x Player sensors
    x AND gates
    x emitters

    x= the number of check points in your level.

    1. Put an AND gate, a player sensor, and an emitter for the sackbot on each checkpoint.
    2. Place The one tag switch (set to the same tag as your sackbot) as inverted and with a maximum radius, and hook it to each of the AND gates.
    3. Hook all player sensors to seperate inputs on the selector, and hook the outputs to all the AND gates.
    4. The AND gates activate the emitter.

    The selector ensures that only one checkpoint will be active at once, and the player sensor ensures its the right one.
    Last edited by cliffbo; 01-30-2011 at 10:13 PM.

  6. #6
    PSN: GribbleGrunger cliffbo's Avatar
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    Thanks to Antikris over at LBPcentral

    A simple homing missile

    This is a small guide into making a simple target-seeking missile. Start off by creating a rocket: the LBP2 missile object or the one from the Metal Gear Solid DLS are perfect for this (set acceleration to 0%, but leave it switched on for a nice smoke trail), but you can make your own as well. It doesn't even need to be a missile. Killer bees are fine, too.

    For the convenience of this guide, point your missile upwards.



    Now we put a microchip on it and put the following logic on it:




    The Rotator will point our missile to its target, while the Mover will give it a continuous forward motion. Make sure the Mover is set to an Up value, instead of the default sideway one, and Local Space (so it will move into the direction it is facing). Give the Rotator a large trigger radius.

    N.B.: in case you are using the existing missile objects, you can choose to leave out the Mover and rely on the missile's own engine instead.

    Per default, the missile will follow the nearest player, but if you tweak the Rotator to aim for a tag, you can have it chase other specific targets as well. Stick an emitter to a dark matter platform and have it spit out missiles to see it in action. With these settings we now have a missile that is almost impossible to dodge; it is very fast and way to manoeuvrable.

    You can go two directions with this:

    1. If you set the Mover to a high speed, then you should set the Rotator speed to a low value; the missile will reach its target very fast but isn't very accurate unless the target is a fast mover himself as well - this is like a real homing missile. The missile also needs a lot of space for this. It is ideal for a flying game.
    2. If you set the Mover to a low speed, then the Rotator speed can go up. The missile will not be as fast and you can avoid it if you are faster. It will, however, make very short turns and be always on your tail. Works best in small, closed environments.




    There is a chance that your missile will make endless circles around a target that, due to its Rotator settings, it cannot reach. For a more fulfilling gameplay experience, you can have the missile blow itself up after a short while. A timer hooked up with a Destroyer will do that for you.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Advanced homing missile

    Here we'll be making the missile set a lock onto a found target and give the target a short time to escape.



    The main difference from the previous guide is that the missile no longer aims for a player, but aims for the lock object. You can see I made a small crosshair out of Halo material (20%). I glued another piece of Halo (0%) to it to be able to stick a chip in the center.

    Instead of picking the player as a target, you can make the missile aim for whatever you like; just change the Followers on the lock to aim for a Tag and the Player Sensor on the lock to a Tag Sensor. We will be using one tag in this guide, though, so keep one reserved.



    The missile here has its Look At Sensor set to follow the teal colored tag on the lock object. We have that tag stuck on both the missile as the lock circuitry, but that will become clear later on.

    The missile will go through three distinct phases:
    1. Fly around aimlessly. The lock will follow the missile around until it finds a target.
    2. Target acquired. The lock will stick to its target and the missile will fly towards the lock.
    3. Target locked. The lock will stop following the target and stand still. The missile will impact soon after. This is the time that the target has to escape.




    Phase 1 - Fly around aimlessly

    A Player Sensor (or a Tag Sensor for alternative targets) will initiate phase 2 when activates, but a NOT gate behind it will make sure phase 1 is triggered (also, to return back to phase 1 in the rare case a target gets suddenly out of range, for instance by dying). The Follower of phase 1 tracks the missile's tag; set it to a very wide radius. Set the minimum range to 3 or 4 so that the lock's own tag will not trigger it.

    Trying to save tags here; it would be a shame to have to use two unique tags alone for this missile. So, we'll use the same tag and a minimum sensor range.

    A Selector is a neat way to switch between logic phases without having to manually reset everything from the previous phase.

    Phase 2 - Target acquired

    When the player gets into range of the Player Sensor, it triggers phase 2. The Follower of phase 2 is now chasing the player at maximum speed. Also, there is a small Timer set to 0.1s that resets itself and thus acts as a pulsar. It fuels a beeping sound here, as well as making the Halo crosshairs flicker.

    Phase 2 also sets off a Timer that determines the time until the missile goes to the next phase.

    I just realised I made a mistake: the timer does not get reset in case the system returns to phase 1; hooking up the phase 1 Selector output to the reset of phase 2's timer should do just that.

    Phase 3 - Target locked

    There is no longer a Follower in this phase but instead a simple Mover, set to 0% speed, 100% deceleration; this makes the lock stop dead in its tracks. Another pulsar with a different beep to indicate your last chance to escape.

    Finally, the lock needs to disappear after the missile has destroyed itself; this can be done by linking a Tag Sensor to a Destroyer. Remember to set the minimum radius of the sensor to 3 or 4 to prevent the lock from blowing itself up.
    Little Big Wooden Labyrinth
    by Goresludge








    Zen Mastermind
    by Elijah_Caine




    ---------- Post added at 09:42 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:55 PM ----------

    New York Times:

    By SETH SCHIESEL
    Published: January 28, 2011

    There’s someone out there on Sony’s PlayStation Network who goes by the name Urbandevill. I’ve never met him. (I assume it’s a he because the online avatar sports yellow eyes, green skin and a long, green beard). I don’t know what country he lives in. In fact, I don’t know anything about him.
    Related

    All I know is that someone in the video game industry should offer this guy a job. Why? Because I have played his truly wondrous creations in LittleBigPlanet 2, Sony’s stunning new entertainment ecosystem for the PlayStation 3.

    Entertainment ecosystem? That may sound like hype, but LittleBigPlanet 2 is much more than a game. Rather, it is the most powerful and accessible toolbox yet made that lets everyday people create their own games and share them with the world. LittleBigPlanet 2 is about allowing folks like Urbandevill to concoct a simple yet infectious strategy game (Galactic Base Defence), a pinball game and even the beginnings of a role-playing narrative called Omicron. Other talented users are making intricate animated videos, racing games, two-dimensional shooters and a flabbergasting variety of running-jumping-swimming-swinging-and-flying adventures (otherwise known as platforming games), all within the unified context of one retail product: LittleBigPlanet 2.

    Here are just a few of the enjoyable diversions I discovered on one particular night, exploring the game’s millions of user-created levels: a pitch-perfect re-creation of the first level of the original Legend of Zelda game; short, user-made movies based on Spider-Man and the Hulk; remakes of the classic arcade games Missile Command and Donkey Kong; an interactive play-through of “Just Dance,” by Lady Gaga; a top-down shooting level reminiscent of the (in)famous AC-130 gunship scene in Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare; and a multiplayer version of the old-school family game Hungry Hungry Hippos.

    And those were just the levels inspired by older, pre-existing media and franchises. The vast majority of stuff people are making in LittleBigPlanet2 is wholly original.

    There is nothing quite like this available for the other major game consoles — the Microsoft Xbox 360 and the Nintendo Wii — or even really for Windows. And that’s a shame, because creating simple games is one of the best ways to demonstrate that computers and software are really all about unleashing creativity, not stifling it.

    One of the saddest aspects of the electronic age is that even as computers have become more powerful and pervasive (ubiquitous even), the ability to create software for them has escaped the reach of everyday people.

    When I was in elementary school in the early 1980s, I could actually write my own simple games in Basic for my Commodore 64, just as my friends could on their Apple IIs. In those days, big game companies released games that helped put the tools of creation in the hands of users, like Electronic Arts’s Pinball Construction Set (1983), Music Construction Set (1984) and Adventure Construction Set (1985). It is no coincidence that Bill Budge, creator of Pinball Construction Set, is scheduled to receive only the second Pioneer Award from the Academy of Interactive Arts and Sciences next month.

    But the rise of proprietary game consoles like the Nintendo Entertainment System and more complex personal computer technologies like the CD-ROM and three-dimensional graphics stifled that populism. And the professional developers, perhaps possessive about their stature, generally stopped releasing user-friendly tools for making games.

    That is, until Sony released the original LittleBigPlanet in 2008. Here, for the first time in a long time, was a mass-market game not called The Sims that also gave users the tools to create their own entertainment. As a practical matter, only the most intrepid users were able to do much more than create platforming levels and a seemingly endless litany of sandbox derby-style downhill racers. But it was an important start.

    Now, with LittleBigPlanet 2, the franchise’s developer, Media Molecule of Britain, has vastly expanded and almost entirely revamped the creation tools of the original. Designing physics around movable objects has been streamlined. Creating computer-controlled characters with rudimentary behaviors is a relative breeze. And the creation tools are amenable to a variety of different genres now, not just platforming.

    Of course making anything that lots of other people will actually enjoy still takes a tremendous amount of dedication and perhaps even skill. That is true in any realm of creation. But if you are, say, a parent who worries that video games are melting your children’s brains, ask them if they wouldn’t like to try their hand at actually making a game.

    You never know. You might end up with the next Urbandevill.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/29/ar...anet.html?_r=1

    ---------- Post added at 09:57 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:42 PM ----------

    Can't wait to see this!!!!

    Thanks to napero7 over at LBPcentral

    Project cube diary - 1

    Project cube is a little project I've been wanting to do in LBP for a long time and now that LBP2 is finally here I can do it. What is this "project cube" you might ask, well, dear reader... Project cube is my own little project to create a working rubik's cube in LBP2.

    It started with me thinking about ideas in my head, using layer movers to make the cube solvable... meh, it wouldn't work too well.
    Maybe have the cube visible two times and each image showing 3 sides... meh, too hard to see what you are doing.
    Then I thought about using hologram. It sounds like the simplest solution. With hologram I can have the cube turnable so that you can choose which side to look at with some overlapping hologram and logic.

    Well, the wonderful idea in my head might still change on the visuals, that's not the important part. The important part is to get the cube to work, be able to turn all sides and have the colours on the sides change accordingly. I thought about it over and over again and finally thought of a way to make the logic work.
    I will post more about that later, so far I can tell that my idea involves at least 48 selectors, 288 and-switches, 288 or-switches and possibly 288 timers (the timers are just there to create a little delay so that the logic doesn't break, although each individual selector needs one timer for each colour)

    Let's see how this turns out, I'm pretty sure I will have something ready pretty soon, it depends on how many wires I actually need to go through and connect back and forth... quick calculations say that the amount of wires is going to be over 9000.
    I didn't really calculate but I think I am right...
    Project cube diary - 2

    Project cube is a little project to create a rubik's cube in LBP2.
    So far I have most of the logic done, only the wires need to be attached. Well, it's not too bad... only 360 wires to have the first part done. After that I have to make the logic for the 12 different turns you can make on the cube (you can turn each side in two directions).

    This is how it looks like right now



    Every colour has 8 microchips (as you may or may not know, the middle part of the cube doesn't move) and 4 of those microchips look like this



    The other 4 look like this



    The reason for the two different microchips is that the corner pieces can change place with 6 different movements while the ones in the middle can only change place with 4 different movements. If you don't understand the difference in the microchips, the other one has 6 inputs in the or-switches while the other one has 4.

    I think I'll have to re-do that, though (don't worry, doesn't take too long with the magic of copypaste) because I forgot to add an or-switch to the circuit nod up in the microchip, it needs to take 6 or 4 inputs depending on which microchip is in question.

    Next up is putting an or-switch into every microchip and then connecting the wires accordingly... after that... well, you'll see
    Project cube diary - 3

    Project cube is my little project to create a rubik's cube in LBP2.
    If you have read my other blog posts you might think that I have made barely any progress...
    Well, while I haven't been working on this as much as I intended, I have made some progress. When I wasn't on the PS3 I wrote down a list of quick codes on which signals go where. There are 180 of those signals and I had to think through all of them.

    I decided to use tags with labels and tag sensors instead of 1440 wires doing the same thing. Why? To be able to have the basic microchip layout look like this



    If you have been using microchips with a little bit more logic than two and gates you might already know that every wire gets an output or input on the side of the microchip. Now, imagine every single one of those little microchips there having at least 24 inputs and 6 outputs, some of them having 36 inputs and 6 outputs. With tags I can have the same signals going back and forth without all the messy and lag-causing wires.

    The layout for the individual microchips has also changed. You see 6 tags to the right and 6 microchips to the left. I didn't take a photo of those microchips there but every one of them has 6 tag sensors responding to the tags I have set them to.



    So far I have put labels on all the tags and put the labels into the tag sensors of three microchips, you might see the black stickers on the yellow circuitboard in the first picture, I use those to mark which ones I have already "coded".

    Well, that's the basic cube logic, then I have to build the logic on how to turn the sides, build the visuals and do some other fancy stuff...
    Last edited by cliffbo; 01-30-2011 at 10:15 PM.

  7. #7
    PSN: GribbleGrunger cliffbo's Avatar
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    another level by Pickled Punk added. one to watch me thinks. Ruof is worth a look too

    ---------- Post added at 04:42 PM ---------- Previous post was at 04:20 PM ----------

    double jump video tutorial added

    ---------- Post added at 04:50 PM ---------- Previous post was at 04:42 PM ----------

    Thanks to ladylyn1 over at LBPcentral

    A Simpe Way to Create Movie Scenes.

    Ok... this is a really easy method to creating movies and individual scenes. I'll explain everything in really baby steps (don't take it in a patronising way!)

    For each scene have an individual sequencer.

    Cameras

    On the sequencer place one battery far left, attach this to the first camera of that scene.

    The remaining cameras in that scene can be linked to each other.

    The last camera in each scene links to the input of the sequencer for the next scene. i.e. last camera in scene 3 links to input of scene 4's sequencer.

    Speech

    Speech placed on the circuit boards of sackbots will mean that their mouths will speak in time with the speech bubble.

    To activate an individual speech bubble, place an elongated battery on the scene's sequencer and attach it to the magic mouth you want.
    (To elongate the battery, select the battery you need and move the right analogue stick up a couple of times. This allows you to vary the length of time the speech is activated)

    Use the same sequencer for all the magic mouths in the scene and just place a new elongated battery for each speech bubble.

    An even better way...

    Posted by fullofwin
    You can also place the magic mouth(s) (elongated as necessary) directly on the sequencer and choose the actor name for the sackbot you want to lip-synch (you have to give your sackbots actor names obviously). If the speech is specific to a single sequence this might be the better option, it also doesn't require attaching any wires to the sackbot.
    Extras

    You can place more batteries (and/or other logic) on the sequencer and attach them to global lighting tools/ music/ switches/ lights etc etc... so everything in each scene is controlled on its specific sequencer!

    Its really simple and because you have a sequencer for each scene you can just watch individual scenes at a time... so I think it's probably one of the best ways to go about creating movies

    Hope this is of help to some people!
    Last edited by cliffbo; 01-31-2011 at 04:26 PM.

  8. #8
    PSN: GribbleGrunger cliffbo's Avatar
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    more tuts and game vids added. you will have to search through them because i'm keeping the creators and certain tutorials together

    ---------- Post added at 09:13 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:18 PM ----------

    i've decided to add in duplicate video tutorials because some are slightly different

  9. #9
    PSN: GribbleGrunger cliffbo's Avatar
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    thanks to Bloblblobl over at LBPcentral

    OK, recently I've been working on a top-down car minigame, so I decided to share some of the knowledge I gained from it. Also, this is my first tutorial, so this might be a bit confusing, and there might be a bit too much information, but oh well. I am also sorry that this tutorial doesn't have any pictures: I'm just too lazy for that

    NOTE: This project isn't completed, so there may be updates.
    UPDATE: Made it easier to read


    How to make semi-advanced top-down bumper car logic
    ================================================== ========================================

    PART 1: BASIC DESIGN
    -----------------------------------------
    STEP 1: Car Design
    First off, you have to make a car. This an optional step, you can use any car you want, this is just how I made my car, so you can use it if you want, or make your own. First, turn on the small grid, and make a 1-Layer Regular Cardboard Rectangle with a 2:3 width-height ratio (I made mine really small, 4X6). Use the Right Triangle Shape to cut off the corners at the top. Next, add 1:2 ratio Regular Sponge wheels on either side (I made mine 1X2 on small grid, with 1 cell spacing, and 1 cell from the cut corners at the top).

    Now, as a bonus step to make it extra fancy, add a 2-cell wide hologram 5-pointed star near the top of the car (we'll change the settings later), and a small LED light at the very bottom in the middle, but leave space for a controllinator in between them. Take a black sticker, and sticker the four sponge rectangles to make them look like wheels, then take a tomato red sticker, and sticker just the body of the car to make it look nice.


    STEP 2: Controllinator + Eye Candy
    Now that you have a simple car, it's time to make it look interesting. First, add a controllinator in between the star hologram and the LED light. Then, hook up the controllinator's active state output to the star and LED light. Change the settings to the star to be yellow and have 100% brightness when it's on, and leave the off settings as is.

    Change the LED light's color to the player color, and leave the off settings unchanged, but tweak the range to your liking. Also, the options for the controllinator don't really matter either, as long as you can get in it, but I disabled the popit so that I could have access to the square button if I needed it.

    NOTE: I forgot to mention, make sure the controllinator is upside down on the car, or sackboy will be facing the wrong way.

    STEP 3: Stage Design
    OK, so the car's all done, but now what? Are we starting to add functionality to it yet? Not quite, we need somewhere to drive it (when I first started making the car, I was experimenting with it, and wasn't expecting to build on it, so I didn't make a stage until I finished the car and car logic, which was a big mistake, as there was a lot of editing to do). First off, make a very large rectangle of grass-looking material (I used a material from LBP 1, they don't have new grass materials in LBP 2, so if you don't own the first, you're out of luck). Make sure it's 1 Layer thick and is at the bottom most layer. Surround it with a fence-ish, or nice-looking material that's 3 layer's thick, to make sure the player can't escape.

    I used the "Wooden Struts" Material from the wood section, and added Orange Jelly from the sponge section at the bottom-most thin layer below the fence, so that the player has something better than a simple blue sky to look at in the background. After that, make sure the rectangle is vertical, so it has a bigger height, and add a checkpoint/entrance near the bottom. After that add a horizontal 1 layer bar of material in the middle layer near the bottom of the stage. The are below the bar will be sort of the parking garage, so that if there's only one player, the other car's won't get in the way. Don't worry, you don't need a gate or anything, since we're going to add a jumping feature to the car! You can add a bunch of obstacles later, you don't need to worry about that now. Now to move on to the logic.

    PART 2: MAKING THE CAR'S ENGINE
    --------------------------------------------------------
    STEP 1: Building the Main Engine - Initial Stuff
    First off, we need to set up the car so that it can actually drive. We'll make the engine's later. If you skipped step 1, all you'll need for this is a car object with a controllinator attached. Here are the recommended settings for the controllinator:

    [----CONTROLLINATOR----------------------]
    NAME: [Optional]
    REMOTE CONTROL: [No]
    DISABLE POPIT: [Recommended]
    TRIGGER RADIUS: [Over 20]
    AUTOMATICALLY ENTER: [Optional]
    SHOW CIRCUITBOARD: [Yes]
    SIDE-MOUNTED: [Not Recommended]
    VISIBLE IN PLAY MODE: [Recommended]
    [-------------------------------------------------]


    Now, make sure you have the circuit board open. We're going to make two microchips; one for the main engine and all the initial stuff, and one for the jumping engine, which we'll use later. These are not needed, but are recommended, for neatness and organization. I put them on either side of the top corners (the controllinator should be upside down so the controllinator's output buttons are at the bottom). Close the jumping engine, we'll work on that later, but keep the driving engine open. We will be making three rows for this engine, each for a different purpose. The initial stuff is in the bottom row for me.

    First off this row is going to have the most logic; five pieces (plus a note). Now, just to make sure you don't confuse yourself, make a note at the bottom left of the circuit board (make sure the board's about 4.5 pieces of logic tall, and 9.5 pieces wide; each piece is about 2X2 grid cells) that says "Initial Logic" so you won't get confused later on. Next to the note add an Advanced Rotator with a speed of 100, Acceleration of 50%, and Deceleration of 0%. Connect the Left/Right movement of the left stick of the controller to the ROTATION SPEED Input of the rotator, NOT the On/Off Input (this is important, otherwise you won't be able to rotate the car). Now you can rotate the car, but gravity is still in effect! Add a Gravity Object Tweaker (not world tweaker) next to the rotator with 100% gravity and 20% Dampening. Now gravity doesn't stop our car!


    But cars usually bounce of walls when they crash into them (or they explode), at least in cartoonish racing games they do, so let's make our car bounce off the walls. Add a Material Tweaker right next to the Gravity Tweaker with 60% bounciness, and make it indestructable, just in case something weird happens. Now, to make it look extra nice, let's add a movie camera for a nice close zoom next to the Material Tweaker. Just make sure not to enable Player Tracking, make it hold for a long time, and not to disable the controller buttons. Now, just to make it a bit more interesting, let's add an ignition sound that sounds when you enter the car. Place a Transport Misc. Sound Effect right next to the movie camera with the sound effect ignition. Leave the settings as is. Now finally, attach the Gravity Tweaker, Material Tweaker, Movie Camera, and Sound effect all to the Active State Output from the controllinator. Now, let's make the engine.

    STEP 2: Building the Main Engine - Moving Forward
    Ok, now let's make the car go forward. On the Driving Engine, there should be three rows,and the bottom one should be full. Now we'll make the top most row, the driving logic. Add a note first that says "Driving Logic." Now, make a mover next to it with 0 left/right speed, 25 up/down speed, local space on, acceleration of 50%, and deceleration of 40%. Hook up the mover's on/off with the R1 button. But no car is complete without exhaust fumes! Add a smoke machine and an emitter next to each other, and right next to the mover. Set the smoke machine to 0 L/R speed, -20 U/D speed, 100% size, with 100% brightness and the default color. Now we have smoke, and all we need is fire from the emitter to make our exhaust fumes complete!


    Choose a fire projectile and emit the smallest possible fire object from the bottom of the car, with a vertical velocity of 1, 0 angular velocity, do NOT ignore parent velocity, 0.0s timing, 0.1s lifetime, 0.0s Sync, infinite quantity, 1 max emitted at one time, and DO destroy old objects. You can tweak the visuals to your liking, but I personally like the Splat effect. Now hook the emitter and smoke machine also to the R1 button. Unfortunately, I do not currently know how to get rid of that annoying sound of the fire projectiles being emitted, so let's try to block that sound with an engine sound effect. Place a Vehicle Engines sound effect next to the emitter, and set it to propeller plane (it's the best sounding engine) with 2.0 Sound Modification, with Position Sound set to OFF. Now hook this to the R1 button, and the forward engine is complete! Now, we need a reverse engine to complete our driving engine.

    STEP 3: Building the Main Engine - Reverse
    Now, we need to finish up our driving engine. This is the simplest one, and we'll make it in the middle row of the microchip. First make a note that says "Reverse Logic." Copy the mover and smoke machine from the Forward engine (we don't need fire for this one). Change the mover U/D speed to -7.5, and the size of the smoke from the smoke machine to 30%. Now all that's left is a sound effect. There's a perfect sound effect for this, but unfortunately it only plays once, even when you hold down the button activating it. But we can fix that with a timer. Place a microchip (just to keep stuff organized) next to the smoke machine. Make the Microchip smaller, we just need 2 pieces of logic (technically one piece and a sound effect).


    Add a timer and a Transport Misc. sound effect right next to it. Set the timer to 1.0s, connect the output to the sound effect and also to it's own reset input, so it will loop. Now change the Transport Misc. SF to Reversing Beep, and leave everything else the same. Now connect the L1 or R2 Button output, whichever is more comfortable, to the reverse mover, smoke machine, and DIRECTLY to the Timer's activate input, not to the microchip's. Now we've finished our driving engine! Congratulations!

    BONUS TIPS:
    • If you press Square over a button on the controllinator's controller, it allows you to change the text that displays when the controllinator is active. This way you can make the R1 Button say drive, X button say jump, etc.
    • Always group together objects in Microchips and add notes; it's easy to forget.
    • To make a permanent switch, create a counter that only goes up to one, starts at zero, and resets itself. To activate it, connect something to it's input, and whatever is connected to it's output will be active until it stops getting input.
    • Whenever you're editing a level, always keep pause on and use Play Mode to test it, or you might suffer from the 160 hour glitch (see the wiki for more info).


    PART 3: MAKING THE CAR JUMP
    --------------------------------------------------
    STEP 1: Jumping with Intermediate Logic
    This part of the tutorial is more advanced and requires knowledge of Intermediate/Semi-Advanced logic. Also, the permanent switch, counters and timers are all good things to know. First off, open the Jumping microchip we've left alone in the corner for all this time. The actual logic for jumping is actually very simple, but it's the concept that may be a bit hard to grasp for beginners. I've found this to be the most effective way for jumping, although I haven't tested it completely, so there may be a few glitches I'm unaware of.

    First thing to do is place a counter at the left side of the microchip. This isn't really necessary, but it cuts down a lot on those nasty wires, so I would use it if I were you. Now set the counter to start at 0 and end at 1. Next step is to make a timer, a in/out (layer) mover, and a Swoosh sound effect, all conveniently next to the counter. Hook up the counter's output to each of this, but don't hook up anything to the counter's reset. Choose swish for the swoosh sound effect, with -12.0 Soundwave modification, set the in/out mover to allow pushing, and to move one layer upwards. Set the timer to start at 0.0s, end at 0.3s (most accurate jump time),and make the input type Start Count Up. If you don't change the input type, his won't work. Basically, what happens so far is that when a button is pressed (will be added later), the counter activates three different actions: it moves the car up a layer, it plays a sound, and starts a timer. Now, hook up the X button to the counter.

    Now we're almost done (with this step). Copy the in/out mover, and place it near the timer, then hook up the timer to the new in/out mover. Change the settings so it moves to the back-most layer (NOT move back ONE layer). Now our jumping system is done! But wait, when you test it out, it only works once! So what's the solution? You may be thinking: oh, just hook up the counter and timer's output to their respective reset inputs! But that's not the answer, because if you are planning on allowing the car to go on elevated land, when the car goes over the edge of the elevated ground, it will stay in the air until you press X, because the jump action jumps, then waits three seconds, and tries to move the car back ONCE. So what's the solution? Let's find out!

    STEP 2: Fixing the Hover Glitch
    Now to fix the hover glitch, all you need is a tag, a tag sensor, and another counter. Place the tag sensor and counter on the opposite side of the jumping microchip than the basic jump logic. Set the counter to 1, just like the other, and set the range of the tag sensor to the width of your field, and the tag color to the same color as your tag. hook up the tag sensor to the counter, and hook up the counter to the timer and other counter's resets.


    Place the tag on a invisible hologram one layer thick, since the controllinator is on top of the car, and place the invisible hologram on the ground level in the corner somewhere. Change the tag sensor so that it detects tags only on the same layer, make sure the count is 1, the angle of range is 360, and the output value is closeness, and NOT signal strength. Finally, hook up the X button to the new counter's reset button. Now, since it only resets when it detects the tag, which is the "ground," it will keep on pushing to the back even when the jump is over.

    THE END
    --------------
    Well, that's all for this tutorial. I hope you found this useful. You can stick that controllinator on any object, like an apple, and it will behave the same way. I will hopefully, update it sometime soon with a guide on making the stage more reacing like, and maybe even adding a gun and enemies, but first I need to make and perfect those myself. This will hopefully be the first of many tutorials. Next tutorial, I'll be showing you how to make a Sackbot logic system, combining all sorts of behaviors and logic, which will require more advanced logic, and more knowledge [UPDATED]. That tutorial will contain a little more advanced logic though, so good luck understanding it when I post it! Please post any suggestions, comments or even questions, and not to mention glitches so that I can answer/incorporate/fix them. Once again, thanks for reading.

    Bye!
    Last edited by cliffbo; 02-28-2011 at 08:07 PM.

  10. #10
    PSN: GribbleGrunger cliffbo's Avatar
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    new stuff added

  11. #11
    PSN: GribbleGrunger cliffbo's Avatar
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    what do you think so far, by the way?

    new tutorial added:

    Create Mode. Part 1: New Materials, Global Controls and Movers
    Create Mode. Part 2: Rotators and New Sensors
    Create Mode. Part 3: Basic and Advanced Logic
    Create Mode. Part 4: World & Object Tweakers and Powerups
    Create Mode. Part 5: Sackbots, Controlinators and Music
    Create Mode. Part 6: Miscellaneous
    Cameras and Dialogue: Part 1
    Cameras and Dialogue: Part 2
    Ac-130 POV Shooter
    Twin Stick Shooter: Part 1
    Twin Stick Shooter: Part 2
    Twin Stick Shooter: Part 3
    Sackbots and Controlinator: Part 1
    Sackbots and Controlinator: Part 2

    new gamplay:

    Karkaneias Caves. By xTrophx
    Here Kitty-Kitty (Movie). by Jayveew1160
    UNO - Classic card game. By Theadipose
    Minesweeper. By Ratchet_PSN
    Classic Zelda 1-1. By Bluetonberry.
    Sonic The Hedgehog - Green Hill Zone Act:1. By Nichrome_Dragon

    ---------- Post added at 10:31 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:33 PM ----------

    LittleBigPlanet 2 Prius Contest is Live, Chance to Win a 3D Bravia TV

    Posted by David Winding // Director of Network Advertising, SCEA

    Hello LittleBigPlanet fans! I just wanted to let you know that our “LittleBigPrius” level which we developed in conjunction with Toyota, is now available for download in LittleBigPlanet 2. You can find it through a simple text search on the Community planet—the “author” is LittleBigPartner.

    As we mentioned earlier, this level is the focal point for a “create your own level” contest which officially begins today. Play our “LittleBigPrius” level to collect prize bubble items, and use these items to create your own Prius-inspired level. When you publish your level to the world, be sure to name it “Prius_ …” so that it will be easy for everyone to find.

    Make sure that you get your level built and published prior to the conclusion of the contest at midnight on March 8th. That’s when we’ll take a close look at the 10 most popular levels, as determined by the LittleBigPlanet community. We’ll be judging these levels based upon originality, quality and polish, Toyota Prius brand awareness, and use of the items obtained from our “LittleBigPrius” level. From these finalists, we’ll pick a Grand Prize winner of a 46” Sony Bravia 3D HDTV and PlayStation Move hardware bundle. We’ll also select four First Place winners of a PlayStation Move Sports Champions bundle.
    http://blog.us.playstation.com/2011/...tation.Blog%29
    Last edited by cliffbo; 02-02-2011 at 09:51 PM.

  12. #12
    _____________ GTAce's Avatar
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    Thanks for everything man! Some really helpful stuff here.
    http://e-mpire.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=19726&dateline=129306  9612

  13. #13
    Uncharted4 Bliss's Avatar
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    My wife bought LBP2, I'm back from my flight and I just saw the Game; I have a printed smile on my face, I'm a child, yes ! After dinner I'll play, in 30 minutes, can't wait.

    ps: who's already creating levels ?

    Cliff, remember, May the 19th and thanks for all the stuff you're posting.
    Last edited by Bliss; 02-04-2011 at 06:14 PM.
    ”Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.”

    Harriet Tubman.

  14. #14
    PSN: GribbleGrunger cliffbo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bliss View Post
    My wife bought LBP2, I'm back from my flight and I just saw the Game; I have a printed smile on my face, I'm a child, yes ! After dinner I'll play, in 30 minutes, can't wait.

    ps: who's already creating levels ?

    Cliff, remember, May the 19th and thanks for all the stuff you're posting.
    i'm excited!!! at last i'll be able to talk about the games subjectively!!!!!!!!!

    ---------- Post added at 06:35 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:28 PM ----------

    Thanks to o0shda0o5 over at LBPcentral

    Hey, when I was making a menu screen for my current level, I had to look around for tutorials for hours to find out all the different things I needed to know, about movie cameras, different control buttons, and even sackbots, so I decided that as soon as I had figured it out, I would write an in-depth tutorial about it, so here goes…

    Right, now every game’s start screen has several options to select, so first off we need to design our menu screen. Here is mine, and for the sake of this tutorial, it’s a 2x2 grid for a zombie survival game, with play, options, info, and team. (In this instance I have used neon bevel which can be turned on and off, but you may want to use holo to surround you selection, or other materials that can be turned on and off) Remember to always have the grid on, just for precision’s sake. Now pop down an entrance with a DCS mounted on it. The settings that you need for it are: remote control set to transmitter, disable popit controls set to yes, set trigger radius to around 10, and automatically enter to yes as well. Remember you don’t need any logic in this one at all



    Now we will need 4 micro chips, one for each selection, in a vertical row. we will name them main menu, info, options, and team. Main menu must be at the top.
    In each microchip we put a dcs set to receiver WITH THE SAME FREQUENCY AS THE ONE ON THE ENTRANCE. these will be our different control schemes.
    Now put down a selector with 4 outputs/inputs, and wire them up to the microchips activate input so no wires overlap.
    now lay down a battery and put it in the first input of the selector.
    For the other inputs, we will want to pair up a toggle gate with an OR gate for each one. So that the output of the or gate is the input to the toggle, and the output to the toggle is the inputs of the selector, like so…



    Now for the main menu, you want to open up the microchip and then the circuit board for the dcs that is inside the microchip. We want to add a movie camera and wire up the “active” output to it. (the active output is in-between where the start button and the select button should be) the movie cameras settings should be: Hold time Infinite, disable controllers no, and skippable no.
    Now for the logic. Inside the main menu microchip, we want 2 selectors, each with 2 outputs and inputs. You want the output of the left stick(Left right)of the dcs in the main menu mc to the cycle of the bottom selector, then the left stick (Up down) to be linked to the cycle of the other selector. Here is a video here that may help. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVhaxKZpl0k
    Now map up 4 AND gates in a 2x2 grid like the menu, and wire up the left output of the bottom selector to the two left most AND gates, the right output of the bottom selector the two right-most AND gates, the bottom output of the top selector to the two bottom-most and gates, and the top output of the top selector to the top two and gates, here Is a screenshot. I have colour coded the selectors so it is easier to see. The circuit nodes aren’t necessary, they just clear it up.



    So people know which option they are selecting, we need to wire up each AND gate to their corresponding selection. I then added another microchip INSIDE the main menu one, and inside there I put another 2x2 grid of and gates there, this will be the actual selection. For these AND gate inputs we need the outputs of the corresponding AND gates from before and the x button from the main menu dcs. Now, for the inputs of that selector from before. We want it so that when their cursor is over their selection AND they press x it activates another menu screen or starts playing. So we put the out put of those and gates into one of the inputs of the OR gates so that like mine, when the bottom left AND gate is activated, the toggle is on, and the selector selects the Options microchip is activated. Leave the output of the play button for now, that has a different part to play. If you like, you could play a confirmation sound when one of the second set of AND gates are activated but I didn’t here.



    That’s the main menu effectively finished, now we move onto the Info page, there is more than one way to do this, but the easiest is doing a cinematic. Open up the Info microchip, now, we want no wires leaving, because there’s no need for the player to control anything here.
    I’m not going to make one as it is quite easy and there is probably a tutorial on cut scenes somewhere, but remember, when the cut scene is finished, you want something to activate the other input to the OR gate near the main selector, to activate the toggle and making the selector go back to the main menu.


    Now, the options menu, not quite as hard as the main menu, depending on what options you need, but first off you will need a screen for it. Try and make it the same theme as the main menu, just for aesthetics.
    Here is mine:



    What I want the controls to be in mine are, left stick to move up and down, x button to toggle and x button on the back button to return to the main menu.
    To start we want a movie camera connected to the active slot of the dcs in the options mc. Same settings as before, but now focused on the options screen. I added a micro chip for all the logic in this menu.
    To start we will need a selector on the far right with three input/outputs, one for each option. This is the UP/DOWN selector. The cycle input for this is the left stick up/down. Link the three outputs to three different AND gates and the three different pieces of neon bevel like in mine. Make the other inputs to these AND gates be the x button from the OPTIONS dcs.
    First the music, make a selector with the number of inputs being how many songs you want the game to play, I used five.
    Link the 5 outputs to five different songs, and the cycle input of the selector is the top AND gate from before.
    Weather now. Same as the music one, but the cycle input of this selector is the second AND gate from before. The outputs are 3 different lighting tweakers.
    Finally the back button. This IS the third AND gate, and the output for this goes down into the OR to Toggle back at the main page.



    Team now. The best way I found to do this was like so. First build a screen, with a little alcove in it, here is mine. ( I would suggest you have the up/down indicators too.) Also set this time’s camera to it.



    Lot of logic in this one, so set up a microchip at the menu and let’s get started.
    First off we fit up the indicators, so in the TEAM microchip, put in a directional splitter. Wire up the left stick (Up/down) to the input of this. Put the positive output to the top indicator and the negative output into the bottom indicator.
    Now in the microchip that is on the teams page, we need a vertical selector with as many inputs/outputs as characters you want. I will use three. Set the cycle input of thi to the left stick up/down. Now we need a three input OR switch in this mc with all three inputs being pulsers (Counters set to one with their output linked to their reset) the inputs to these pulsers are the three outputs of the selector. Add a tag of your choice and connect the output of the or switch to it. Below this all you want a series of three timers all set to 0.1 and input action start counting up. Link the outputs of these to their resets. inputs of these are the outputs of the selector. Each timer links to an emitter with the following settings: all velocities set to zero. Lifetime infinity, input action emit once, Max emmited at once = 1 and create effect either appear or expand.



    For the actual characters, we need three sackbots, all of the same size that vaguely fit in the little alcove. In the circuit board you will want a tag sensor that detects the one from the previous circuitry, radius around 30, linked to a destroyer, with either disappear or shrink. Pop all three off screen and design all the costumes Depending on the kind of game. Here are mine.



    Capture each sackbot as an object, and load each one into the emitters that are in the mc on the team menu. To make this your character, make each selector output lead to an AND gate and to an emitter each, the other AND gate input being the play button output.

    Thanks for reading this tutorial and I hope that it helped you, if you need help, or have anything to contribute, ask and I will try to help/add it to the OP. Thanks again

    o0shda0o5
    Thanks to Gryphus over at LBPcentral

    Super-Jump glitch under high gravity (with jumping at player choice).

    Hello there! First I must say that this glitch is based on warlord_evil gravity manipulator for LBP1, but this glitch / tutorial is for LBP2 because it use the gravity settings.

    Let's start: I was kinda excited by lbp2 gravity option when I noticed that it will be available prior to game release, but after playing with it I'm kinda dissapointed because it only affects gravity "per se", which means that if you want your sackboy to jump higher, you also have the drawback of that same sackboy floating on the level for a undesirable amount of time.

    I have an ongoing project to recreate some Master System cult games in LBP, so the jump calibration is one of the major issues.


    Making some weird experiments on my test-lab level while taking a break from level construction I've found that with warlord_evil jump manipulator, and gravity over 100%, the sackboy will gain an exponential increase in jump lenght without the need to make characters floaty, while all other jumping devices (or the ausence of jumping devices) are less effective with higher gravity.
    Jumping plataforms and bounce pads wasn't an option for me because I want the player to decide when he will press the jump button.

    Want to see something fun? Just try it:
    -First, replicate the warlord_evil gravity manipulator as seen on the tutorial. Set the rod to 60
    -For testing purposes, adjust in global settings gravity to a low setting. Try to jump on clean floor, and see how your sackboy floats while you can't do nothing.
    -Now set gravity to the maximun level (400%). Jump on clean floor, and you will see that you have a precise control, but that isn't good because you cannot jump very high.

    -So, now, just put your sackboy over warlord_evil manipulator and jump again....

    -Here we go, Over9000. Great jumping without floaty sackboy

    Playing with the lengh of the rod AND the gravity value you can virtually adjust all jumping lenghts at your desire on your levels. Obviously it has many limitations, but it's really usefull for retro 2d-like plataforming that only use the front layer.

    I've made a demostration level of this principle that you can find on my profile. You can find it searching my profile: http://lbp.me/v/xbhqme/info . I've put a prize with prototype plataform to ease things at the end of the level.
    Thanks to Ryshark over at LBPcentral

    Plasma Colo(u)r Glitch!

    This glitch enables you to change the colo(u)r of some previously unchangeable objects.

    1: Get the object, and put a Danger Tweaker on it.
    2: Set it to plasma.
    3: Change the colo(u)r of the plasma, and the object color should change with it.
    4: Remove the danger tweaker.

    Affected Objects:

    Paintballs.
    Creature Wheels (affects the color of the main wheel)
    Scoreboards (affects the color of the stitching of the bottom when "plastic" is used.)
    Every projectile except for water and plasma ball.


    Also, if you want to test out more objects, your welcome!
    ---------- Post added at 07:16 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:35 PM ----------

    added today:

    Mouse Maze 1. By Ryan Richards94
    Block Planet. By Jiggycake
    Donkey Kong (retro). By Chazprime
    Tron Lightcycle Battle. By The_Lewk
    Monochrome. By NeoNintendo5
    Sonic The Hedgehog: Green Hill Zone - Act:2. By Nichrome_Dragon
    Cause and Effect 5. By TripleTremelo
    Sackeratinator 3000. By Blastroid
    Lights and Shadows. By Scorpskull
    Starry Night, By Ruof
    Last edited by cliffbo; 02-05-2011 at 08:42 PM.

  15. #15
    Uncharted4 Bliss's Avatar
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    All this is so interesting.

    I've just started the story, finished the first 2 levels, lovely, funny, relaxing, humorous, beautiful, I love the hook and shooting sweets The graphics is improved, my previous LBP1 levels now look better, the fire effects are great. LBP2 will own me, as I finish the story, I'll create my first Level.
    ”Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.”

    Harriet Tubman.

  16. #16
    PSN: GribbleGrunger cliffbo's Avatar
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    be sure to Youtube it so i can add it!!!

  17. #17
    Uncharted4 Bliss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliffbo View Post
    be sure to Youtube it so i can add it!!!
    For sure ! I'll youtube Ghosts&Scheletons, the last Level I created with LBP1 Editor; then I'll focus on the new Editor
    ”Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.”

    Harriet Tubman.

  18. #18
    PSN: GribbleGrunger cliffbo's Avatar
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    Video Tutorials:

    360 Degree Aiming
    3D Layer Followers
    5 Level Elevator
    Ac-130 POV Shooter
    Aiming System 1
    Aiming System 2
    Analog Memory Cells & Other Useful Electronics
    Analog Signal Plotter (work in progress)
    Analog signal processing via logic gates
    Boost
    Cameras and Dialogue: Part 1
    Cameras and Dialogue: Part 2
    Cameras for each player
    Cameras: Movies/Films/Cut-scenes
    Camera Rotation and Adv. Mover Solved
    Car Tutorial: How To Make a Car
    Car Tutorial: Part 1
    Car Tutorial: Part 2
    Control analog signal with digital signal and vice-versa
    Controlinator Basics
    Controlinator: respawn in controlinator
    Create
    Create Mode. Part 1: New Materials, Global Controls and Movers
    Create Mode. Part 2: Rotators and New Sensors
    Create Mode. Part 3: Basic and Advanced Logic
    Create Mode. Part 4: World & Object Tweakers and Powerups
    Create Mode. Part 5: Sackbots, Controlinators and Music
    Create Mode. Part 6: Miscellaneous
    Creatinator Coaster tutorial
    Creating a flying machine
    Creating with Foofles
    Cursor Tracking System/Barriers
    Custom Jump Chip
    Custom Water Volumes: Part 1
    Custom Water Volumes: Part 2
    Digital Clock/Counter
    Direction Splitter/Direction Combiner
    Double Jump 1
    Double Jump 2
    Double Jump Part 1 - One Shot Button w/Debounce
    Double Jump Part 2 - One Shot Timer
    Double Jump Part 3 - Toggle Reset
    Dynamic Fire
    Electricity Movement
    First Person Shooter - Part 1
    First Person Shooter - Part 2
    First Person Shooter - Part 3
    Glitch: Glue distant objects without any physical connection
    Glitch: Invisible Objects
    Glitch: Major 4th Layer Glitch
    Glitch: Twist Tutorial
    Glitch: Walkthrough Glitch
    Glitch: Water Glitch
    Grid Movement
    Grid Rotation
    Holographic Health Bar 1
    Holographic Health Bar 2
    Holographic sprite making
    How To Make A Level
    HUD creation Part 1
    HUD creation part 2
    Ice Fatality Tutorial
    Invisible Limitation
    Jump Through Glass
    LBP2-Torials 01: Sequencers
    LBP2-Torials 02: Signal Addition and Subtraction
    LBP2-Torials 03: Probability with Randomizers
    LBP2-Torials 04: Sackbots, Followers, and Checkpoints
    LBP2-Torials 05: Health Bars and Addition Applications
    LBP2-Torials 06: Menus with Pulses and Time-Independent Movie Cameras
    LBP2-Torials 07: Player Counters and Wireless Signals
    LBP2-Torials 08: Infinite Scrolling and Wireless Signals
    LBP2-Torials 09: Level Linking
    LBP2-Torials 10: Level Linking and Data Transfer
    LBP2-Torials 11: Ordered Inputs and Lockboxes (Part 1)
    LBP2-Torials 11: Ordered Inputs and Lockboxes (Part 2)
    LBP2-Torials 12: Working with Extra Layers
    Light-Sabar Tutorial
    Logic: Part 1 - Constant on
    Logic: Part 2 - Inverting
    Logic: Part 3 - On then off with time limit
    Logic: Part 4 - On then random
    Logic: Advanced 1
    Logic: Advanced 2
    Logic: Basic 1
    Logic: Basic 2
    Logic Emmiters
    Logic Movers
    Logic: Pyromania and basic
    Logic: Solid State
    Logic: Timers
    Logic Tricks
    Logic Tricks: Analog signal analization
    Making A Tank
    Menu: Advanced
    Menu: Alternative Cursor Movement
    Menu: Money/Shop
    Menu: Selection Screen
    Menu Tutorial Part 1
    Menu Tutorial Part 2: Mouse UI Tutorial
    Microchips: How to decorate them
    Microchips: Pulse Power Selector
    Microchips: Reusable functions with microchips/threshold chip
    Minesweeper: Behind The Scenes
    Moonwalking
    Movers: Advanced 1
    Movers: Advanced 2
    Movers and Sequencers (basics)
    Moving platforms version 1
    Moving platforms version 2
    Music Chooser
    Music Creation
    Music Sequencer 1
    Music Sequencer 2
    Number Of Players 1
    Number Of Players 2
    Object Tweakers
    Paintinator: How to make a wall disappear
    Perma switch, set-reset and 'One-shooter'
    Platforms: Floating
    Platforms: Flying
    Points as Money
    Pong Tutorial
    Popit Features-Categorize & Organize
    Power Ups (without sackbots)
    Pulse Power Selector
    Radius Detector (Closeness)
    Rain drops into Ice drops
    Sackbots: Advanced
    Sackbot and Controlinator: Part 1
    Sackbot and Controlinator: Part 2
    Sackbot and Bouncepads
    Sackbot Basics 1
    Sackbot Basics 2
    Sackbot Basics 3
    Sackbot Basics: Pan-Cam
    Sackbot: Basic enemies
    Sackbot Check Point
    Sackbot: Collect Score Bubbles
    Sackbot: Controlling
    Sackbot: Control with Controllinator
    Sackbot Control Override
    Sackbot Control Synchronization and Filtering
    Sackbot: Death Cut-scenes
    Sackbot: destroy with Paintinator
    Sackbot: Emit things (Sackbot weapons)
    Sackbot: Flee from a tag
    Sackbot: Giving them powers
    Sackbot: Kill by circuit
    Sackbot: Making A Zombie - Part 1
    Sackbot: Making A Zombie - Part 2
    Sackbot: Remote Control
    Sackbot: Respawn Point
    Sackbot: SackSuit Microchip
    Sackbot: Stuck In Ice
    Sackbot Tracking Camera
    Sackbot: Tube Bots - Part 1
    Sackbot: Tube Bots - Part 2
    Sackbot: Tube Bots - Part 3
    Selector-based Counter/Timer Display - Part 1
    Selector-based Counter/Timer Display - Part 2
    Sequencers: part 1 - Basic Intro
    Sharing Costumes
    Smoke Machine
    Space Odyssey. level tutorial
    Spotlight follows player
    Teleportation 1
    Teleportation 2
    Teleportation: Death-less/Bot-less
    Top-Down Car: Simple
    Top-Down racer: lap counter
    Top-Down Twin-Stick Shooter - Part 1: Basic Controls
    Top-Down Twin-Stick Shooter - Part 2: Spawning enemies
    Top-Down Twin-Stick Shooter - Part 3: Switching to a remote controllinator
    Top-Down Twin-Stick Shooter - Part 4: Health Bars
    Top-Down jumping car
    Top-Down vehicle controller
    Top-Down view
    Transfering Data Between Levels
    True/False states with Counters
    Twin Stick Shooter: Part 1
    Twin Stick Shooter: Part 2
    Twin Stick Shooter: Part 3
    Walking Legs Tutorial
    Wall Jumping Tutorial. part 1
    Wall Jumping Tutorial. part 2
    Wall Walking
    Weapon Switching
    Wireless Mode

    Written Tutorials:

    3D Objects
    Analogue: Determining Origin Of Strongest Signal
    Analogue: Divide Signals
    Analogue Multiple values (Range 0-100)
    Analogue Signal Display
    Analogue To Digital Conversion
    Animation: Speeding Up And Slowing Down
    Black Hole
    Camera: Creating Cut-scenes
    Camera: Creating Movies
    Camera: Cut-Scenes
    Camera: Record Attacks
    Camera: Objects As Actors
    Camera: Tilt With Pad
    Changable Attack
    Character Selector
    Code Sequence
    Complex Logic Chips
    Controllinator: Various Damage
    Controllinator: Choose Working Buttons
    Convert Timer Into Health Bar
    Costume Sharing
    Creatinator Customization
    Creation Tips. Various
    Digital Counter: Scalable
    Digital Readout: 8/20 Bit
    Digital Value Functions
    Direction Inverter
    Fonts: Custom With Little Thermo Use
    Glitch: 3D Camera
    Glitch: Link Distant Objects Without Physical Connection
    Glitch: Merge Items
    Glitch: Plasma Colour
    Glitch: Walk-Through Objects
    Glitch: Walk Through Walls
    Gravity Flipping
    Grid-Movement: Fast And Simple
    Global Sound Switches
    Guitar Hero Like Game
    Health/Damage For Values 1 to 864000
    Hidden Control Icons And Custom Unicode Symbols
    High Gravity, High Jump
    Hologram: Black Holograms
    Hologram: Show Up In Foreground Layers
    Holographic Animation
    Holographic Menu
    Holographic Stickers
    Homing Missile: Advanced
    Homing Missile: Basic
    Hover Tech
    Invisible Thin Wall
    Logic: Analogue Logic - Notation
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 1 - Fundamentals
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 2 - Sorting & Addition
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 3 - DAC & ADC
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 4 - Basics of Sampling & Scaling
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 5 - Division & Multiplication
    Logic: Analogue Logic Toolset (Zero Latency)
    Logic: Binary
    Logic: Charging Logic
    Logic: Custom Logic
    Logic: LBPC Logic Pack Tools with LBP2 Gizmos
    Logic: Managing Complex Logic
    Logic: Observations about Player Data And Gates
    Logic: Part 1 - AND and OR
    Logic: Part 2 - Microchips
    Logic: Permanent Switch
    Logic: Speed Sensor, Signal Change Sensor
    Logic: Tidbits
    Menu, Grid And Gameboard
    Menu: In-depth Tutorial
    Microchip: Battery Without Battery, Looping Signal
    Microchip: Step By Step
    Movers And Precision
    Movers: Move At Right Angles
    Moving Platforms Without Pistons
    Music Sequencer: 10 Things You Didn't Know
    Music Sequencer: Synchronised To Normal Sequencer
    Music Sequencer: Something You May Not Know
    Music: Transposing To Music Sequencer
    Paintinator: Shoot Anything
    Perfect Stopwatch
    Personal Anti-Projectile Shield
    Race Gates Using Wires
    Release Switch
    Rooms For Maze Game
    Sackbot: Advanced Control
    Sackbot: A.I And Logic Tutorials
    Sackbot: Attributes/Lives
    Sackbot: Checkpoint System
    Sackbot: Checkpoint With Sackboy Checkpoint Visuals
    Sackbot: Knocking Back When Hit
    Sackbot: Make Selector React To Sackbot Emotions
    Sackbot: Patrol Bot That Can't See Through Walls
    Sackbot: Swim and Move Under water
    Sackbot: Toggle Between Sackbot And Controllinator
    Sackbot: Toggle Multiple Sackbots With One Controllinator
    Sackbot: Wall Climbing
    Sackbot: Weapon Selector
    Scoreboard/Counter
    Sequence/Object Emitter/Generator
    Speed, Rotation And Length Units
    Teleportation: Cursor Based
    Teleportation: Seamless
    Teleportation: Simple Deathless
    Thermometer: Infinite Thermometer Trick
    Top-Down Bumper Car Logic
    Top-Down Controllable Object
    Top-Down: Fog Out Areas
    Top-Down Movement
    Top-Down: Various
    Vehicle Transmission Logic
    Voice Recording (Top Tip)
    Weapons: Cool-down Timers

    Game Videos (For Inspiration):

    A16-bit_chris: Mario World 1-1 (8-Bit)
    Alexgangsta4: Art World
    Angel-Box: Pengauno
    Arnieboy74: Batman The Dark Knight Rises (Movie)
    Basketsnake: Honeyland
    Beast_Maker: Cardboard Cutout
    Bender_82: The Amazon
    Blastroid: Sackeratinator 3000
    Bluetonberry: Classic Zelda 1-1
    Chazprime: Donkey Kong (retro)
    Chicoleunis: Da Vinci's first handcrafted Factory
    Chimpanzee: Pegged 2
    CitrusRobot: The Great Forest: Moomamoomas
    Comphermc: Wizard Beta (work in progress)
    Crazy_Tito: Mystic Cave
    cRckls: !CALAVERA! Pinball
    Cuzfeeshe: Vectroids
    Deewtog12: Block Zombies
    Dethoptix: LittleBigZelda Engine V1.1
    Distinct-Creator: Fiore, A Relaxing Platformer
    DVCV92: Little Big Puzzles
    ElevenBane: Wooly Bully
    Exalted_Yawn: Ivory Tower - The Cascading Spire
    Fastbro: Frostbite DX
    Felkroth: Frozen Flame - Chapter 1 (part 1)
    Felkroth: Frozen Flame - Chapter 1 (part 2)
    Foggles: Aliens V Zombots
    Foofles: Maximum Carnage
    Fotosynthesis1: Spike World [Extended]
    Fyshokid: Stereo/mono 2
    Gevurah22: The Fist of Craft Earth
    Gevurah22 : Dragon Knight (work in progress)
    Gonflette: Realistic Pinball Simulation
    Gruntosuk: Geometry Wars
    Gruntosuk: Venice is sinking
    Gurichan: Pac-man
    Gyro_bot: Yeti Must Sleep!! V30
    Halestorm_6: Mini Golf (1-4 players)
    Hm83: Pinball Gold
    I_Pinky_I: Moon Lander 2
    Jaeyden: Dragon Slayer Part 1 & 2
    Jaslow: If Trees Could Speak
    JayveewII60: Here Kitty-Kitty (Movie)
    JayveewII60: Operation Rocking Chair! (Movie)
    Jiggycake: Block Planet
    Johnee: Blast Radius
    Jump_button: Side/Top Down Platfomer|8-BIT
    Jump_Button: Black & White Planet 3
    JustinArt: Tilt, Roll and Drop
    LadyIyn1: Zombird Apocalypse Preview
    L1ghtmare: Cyberstrata
    Lockstitch: For Vanished Heights
    Lockstitch: A Realm Forgotten
    Lockstitch: Vile Anchorage
    Lockstitch: Refuse Ridge
    Luos_83: The Ancient Cave of New Beh'Ta
    Luos_83: Lockpick's Maze
    Luos_83: Master of Momentum
    Makotoi: Peggle
    Malhat06: Patchwork World
    Mat1989Rudo: Angry Birds - Level 1
    Mcdonald1967: Crafting-platformer
    Metalhead_AS: A Broken Paradise
    Metalhead_AS: Ruins of Albion
    Mick_Leopard: An Average Adventure - 1st Discovery
    MistyPahasapa: Getting Into The Swing
    Mr_Hijinx: Bunchy's Adventure (a pixel platformer)
    MuddledMuppet:Sackberg Presents: Hamlet - To be or not to be Created (Movie)
    NeoNintendo5: Monochrome
    Nichrome_Dragon: Sonic The Hedgehog: Green Hill Zone - Act:1
    Nichrome_Dragon: Sonic The Hedgehog: Green Hill Zone - Act:2
    Nichrome_Dragon: Sonic The Hedgehog: Green Hill Zone - Act:3
    NonI100Percent: Flat World 2
    Nuclearfish: Clockworx 2
    Pate59: The Mountain of Motocross
    Pencil_Rain: Poultry Panic
    Phort: Cave Story - First Cave
    Pickled-Punk: Deliver me from Eve
    Pickled-Punk: Deliver me from Eve: Adventurers District
    Pickled-Punk: Deliver me from Eve: The Moolah Nightmarket
    Poms: The Lost Pharao
    PwnArtist: Beta Complex
    QueenCherry: Madame Pipe
    QueenCherry: Skytation
    QueenCherry: Granny Gertrude's Babysitting Center
    QueenCherry: Dream a Little Dream
    Ramore: Aztec Secret
    Ratchet_PSN: Minesweeper
    Rhansen2: Prius_Eco Adventure
    Ruof: Starry Night
    Ruof: Little Platformer 2
    Ryan Richards94: Mouse Maze 1
    Scorpskull: Lights and Shadows
    simsim0001: Frogger
    ShadowriverUB: Tetris
    ShamgarBlade: Shamgar's Hideout
    smasher1116789 : Monster Pinball 2
    Smashrash: The Floating Islands Of Kaladar
    Spenson66: Clove Space
    Spidermaguire: Affraid (Movie)
    Splapp-me-do: Sackro Machines Championship
    Steve_big_guns: Mediterranean Street Racing
    Sx_Shookie99: The Unknown Depths of the Cavernous Catacombs
    Sx_Shookie99: Honey Factory Fiasco (Prologue)
    Sylzoid: SODA BLOB - RETRO Adventures (World-1)
    Syroc: Caribbean Carnage
    Tawarf: Divine Nature
    Theadipose: UNO - Classic card game
    The_Lewk: Little Big Battle Racing
    The_Lewk: Tron Lightcycle Battle
    ToykyoMegaplex: La Tea Die
    ToykyoMegaplex: What Goes Up Must Go Down
    TripleTremelo: Cause and Effect 5
    Urbandevill: Galactic Base Defence 1.3
    Urbandevill: Omicron: Neon City
    WillGuitarGuy: Cogpunks - Meeting The Baker
    xSLEVENx: Obscurity
    xTrophx: Karkaneias Caves


    Video Tutorials:

    360 Degree Aiming
    3D Layer Followers
    5 Level Elevator
    Ac-130 POV Shooter
    Aiming System 1
    Aiming System 2
    Analog Memory Cells & Other Useful Electronics
    Analog Signal Plotter (work in progress)
    Analog signal processing via logic gates
    Boost
    Cameras and Dialogue: Part 1
    Cameras and Dialogue: Part 2
    Cameras for each player
    Cameras: Movies/Films/Cut-scenes
    Camera Rotation and Adv. Mover Solved
    Car Tutorial: How To Make a Car
    Car Tutorial: Part 1
    Car Tutorial: Part 2
    Control analog signal with digital signal and vice-versa
    Controlinator Basics
    Controlinator: respawn in controlinator
    Create
    Create Mode. Part 1: New Materials, Global Controls and Movers
    Create Mode. Part 2: Rotators and New Sensors
    Create Mode. Part 3: Basic and Advanced Logic
    Create Mode. Part 4: World & Object Tweakers and Powerups
    Create Mode. Part 5: Sackbots, Controlinators and Music
    Create Mode. Part 6: Miscellaneous
    Creatinator Coaster tutorial
    Creating a flying machine
    Creating with Foofles
    Cursor Tracking System/Barriers
    Custom Jump Chip
    Custom Water Volumes: Part 1
    Custom Water Volumes: Part 2
    Digital Clock/Counter
    Direction Splitter/Direction Combiner
    Double Jump 1
    Double Jump 2
    Double Jump Part 1 - One Shot Button w/Debounce
    Double Jump Part 2 - One Shot Timer
    Double Jump Part 3 - Toggle Reset
    Dynamic Fire
    Electricity Movement
    First Person Shooter - Part 1
    First Person Shooter - Part 2
    First Person Shooter - Part 3
    Glitch: Glue distant objects without any physical connection
    Glitch: Invisible Objects
    Glitch: Major 4th Layer Glitch
    Glitch: Twist Tutorial
    Glitch: Walkthrough Glitch
    Glitch: Water Glitch
    Grid Movement
    Grid Rotation
    Holographic Health Bar 1
    Holographic Health Bar 2
    Holographic sprite making
    How To Make A Level
    HUD creation Part 1
    HUD creation part 2
    Ice Fatality Tutorial
    Invisible Limitation
    Jump Through Glass
    LBP2-Torials 01: Sequencers
    LBP2-Torials 02: Signal Addition and Subtraction
    LBP2-Torials 03: Probability with Randomizers
    LBP2-Torials 04: Sackbots, Followers, and Checkpoints
    LBP2-Torials 05: Health Bars and Addition Applications
    LBP2-Torials 06: Menus with Pulses and Time-Independent Movie Cameras
    LBP2-Torials 07: Player Counters and Wireless Signals
    LBP2-Torials 08: Infinite Scrolling and Wireless Signals
    LBP2-Torials 09: Level Linking
    LBP2-Torials 10: Level Linking and Data Transfer
    LBP2-Torials 11: Ordered Inputs and Lockboxes (Part 1)
    LBP2-Torials 11: Ordered Inputs and Lockboxes (Part 2)
    LBP2-Torials 12: Working with Extra Layers
    Light-Sabar Tutorial
    Logic: Part 1 - Constant on
    Logic: Part 2 - Inverting
    Logic: Part 3 - On then off with time limit
    Logic: Part 4 - On then random
    Logic: Advanced 1
    Logic: Advanced 2
    Logic: Basic 1
    Logic: Basic 2
    Logic Emmiters
    Logic Movers
    Logic: Pyromania and basic
    Logic: Solid State
    Logic: Timers
    Logic Tricks
    Logic Tricks: Analog signal analization
    Making A Tank
    Menu: Advanced
    Menu: Alternative Cursor Movement
    Menu: Money/Shop
    Menu: Selection Screen
    Menu Tutorial Part 1
    Menu Tutorial Part 2: Mouse UI Tutorial
    Microchips: How to decorate them
    Microchips: Pulse Power Selector
    Microchips: Reusable functions with microchips/threshold chip
    Minesweeper: Behind The Scenes
    Moonwalking
    Movers: Advanced 1
    Movers: Advanced 2
    Movers and Sequencers (basics)
    Moving platforms version 1
    Moving platforms version 2
    Music Chooser
    Music Creation
    Music Sequencer 1
    Music Sequencer 2
    Number Of Players 1
    Number Of Players 2
    Object Tweakers
    Paintinator: How to make a wall disappear
    Perma switch, set-reset and 'One-shooter'
    Platforms: Floating
    Platforms: Flying
    Points as Money
    Pong Tutorial
    Popit Features-Categorize & Organize
    Power Ups (without sackbots)
    Pulse Power Selector
    Radius Detector (Closeness)
    Rain drops into Ice drops
    Sackbots: Advanced
    Sackbot and Controlinator: Part 1
    Sackbot and Controlinator: Part 2
    Sackbot and Bouncepads
    Sackbot Basics 1
    Sackbot Basics 2
    Sackbot Basics 3
    Sackbot Basics: Pan-Cam
    Sackbot: Basic enemies
    Sackbot Check Point
    Sackbot: Collect Score Bubbles
    Sackbot: Controlling
    Sackbot: Control with Controllinator
    Sackbot Control Override
    Sackbot Control Synchronization and Filtering
    Sackbot: Death Cut-scenes
    Sackbot: destroy with Paintinator
    Sackbot: Emit things (Sackbot weapons)
    Sackbot: Flee from a tag
    Sackbot: Giving them powers
    Sackbot: Kill by circuit
    Sackbot: Making A Zombie - Part 1
    Sackbot: Making A Zombie - Part 2
    Sackbot: Remote Control
    Sackbot: Respawn Point
    Sackbot: SackSuit Microchip
    Sackbot: Stuck In Ice
    Sackbot Tracking Camera
    Sackbot: Tube Bots - Part 1
    Sackbot: Tube Bots - Part 2
    Sackbot: Tube Bots - Part 3
    Selector-based Counter/Timer Display - Part 1
    Selector-based Counter/Timer Display - Part 2
    Sequencers: part 1 - Basic Intro
    Sharing Costumes
    Smoke Machine
    Space Odyssey. level tutorial
    Spotlight follows player
    Teleportation 1
    Teleportation 2
    Teleportation: Death-less/Bot-less
    Top-Down Car: Simple
    Top-Down racer: lap counter
    Top-Down Twin-Stick Shooter - Part 1: Basic Controls
    Top-Down Twin-Stick Shooter - Part 2: Spawning enemies
    Top-Down Twin-Stick Shooter - Part 3: Switching to a remote controllinator
    Top-Down Twin-Stick Shooter - Part 4: Health Bars
    Top-Down jumping car
    Top-Down vehicle controller
    Top-Down view
    Transfering Data Between Levels
    True/False states with Counters
    Twin Stick Shooter: Part 1
    Twin Stick Shooter: Part 2
    Twin Stick Shooter: Part 3
    Walking Legs Tutorial
    Wall Jumping Tutorial. part 1
    Wall Jumping Tutorial. part 2
    Wall Walking
    Weapon Switching
    Wireless Mode

    Written Tutorials:

    3D Objects
    Analogue: Determining Origin Of Strongest Signal
    Analogue: Divide Signals
    Analogue Multiple values (Range 0-100)
    Analogue Signal Display
    Analogue To Digital Conversion
    Animation: Speeding Up And Slowing Down
    Black Hole
    Camera: Creating Cut-scenes
    Camera: Creating Movies
    Camera: Cut-Scenes
    Camera: Record Attacks
    Camera: Objects As Actors
    Camera: Tilt With Pad
    Changable Attack
    Character Selector
    Code Sequence
    Complex Logic Chips
    Controllinator: Various Damage
    Controllinator: Choose Working Buttons
    Convert Timer Into Health Bar
    Costume Sharing
    Creatinator Customization
    Creation Tips. Various
    Digital Counter: Scalable
    Digital Readout: 8/20 Bit
    Digital Value Functions
    Direction Inverter
    Fonts: Custom With Little Thermo Use
    Glitch: 3D Camera
    Glitch: Link Distant Objects Without Physical Connection
    Glitch: Merge Items
    Glitch: Plasma Colour
    Glitch: Walk-Through Objects
    Glitch: Walk Through Walls
    Gravity Flipping
    Grid-Movement: Fast And Simple
    Global Sound Switches
    Guitar Hero Like Game
    Health/Damage For Values 1 to 864000
    Hidden Control Icons And Custom Unicode Symbols
    High Gravity, High Jump
    Hologram: Black Holograms
    Hologram: Show Up In Foreground Layers
    Holographic Animation
    Holographic Menu
    Holographic Stickers
    Homing Missile: Advanced
    Homing Missile: Basic
    Hover Tech
    Invisible Thin Wall
    Logic: Analogue Logic - Notation
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 1 - Fundamentals
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 2 - Sorting & Addition
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 3 - DAC & ADC
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 4 - Basics of Sampling & Scaling
    Logic: Analogue Logic Part 5 - Division & Multiplication
    Logic: Analogue Logic Toolset (Zero Latency)
    Logic: Binary
    Logic: Charging Logic
    Logic: Custom Logic
    Logic: LBPC Logic Pack Tools with LBP2 Gizmos
    Logic: Managing Complex Logic
    Logic: Observations about Player Data And Gates
    Logic: Part 1 - AND and OR
    Logic: Part 2 - Microchips
    Logic: Permanent Switch
    Logic: Speed Sensor, Signal Change Sensor
    Logic: Tidbits
    Menu, Grid And Gameboard
    Menu: In-depth Tutorial
    Microchip: Battery Without Battery, Looping Signal
    Microchip: Step By Step
    Movers And Precision
    Movers: Move At Right Angles
    Moving Platforms Without Pistons
    Music Sequencer: 10 Things You Didn't Know
    Music Sequencer: Synchronised To Normal Sequencer
    Music Sequencer: Something You May Not Know
    Music: Transposing To Music Sequencer
    Paintinator: Shoot Anything
    Perfect Stopwatch
    Personal Anti-Projectile Shield
    Race Gates Using Wires
    Release Switch
    Rooms For Maze Game
    Sackbot: Advanced Control
    Sackbot: A.I And Logic Tutorials
    Sackbot: Attributes/Lives
    Sackbot: Checkpoint System
    Sackbot: Checkpoint With Sackboy Checkpoint Visuals
    Sackbot: Knocking Back When Hit
    Sackbot: Make Selector React To Sackbot Emotions
    Sackbot: Patrol Bot That Can't See Through Walls
    Sackbot: Swim and Move Under water
    Sackbot: Toggle Between Sackbot And Controllinator
    Sackbot: Toggle Multiple Sackbots With One Controllinator
    Sackbot: Wall Climbing
    Sackbot: Weapon Selector
    Scoreboard/Counter
    Sequence/Object Emitter/Generator
    Speed, Rotation And Length Units
    Teleportation: Cursor Based
    Teleportation: Seamless
    Teleportation: Simple Deathless
    Thermometer: Infinite Thermometer Trick
    Top-Down Bumper Car Logic
    Top-Down Controllable Object
    Top-Down: Fog Out Areas
    Top-Down Movement
    Top-Down: Various
    Vehicle Transmission Logic
    Voice Recording (Top Tip)
    Weapons: Cool-down Timers

    Game Videos (For Inspiration):

    A16-bit_chris: Mario World 1-1 (8-Bit)
    Alexgangsta4: Art World
    Angel-Box: Pengauno
    Arnieboy74: Batman The Dark Knight Rises (Movie)
    Basketsnake: Honeyland
    Beast_Maker: Cardboard Cutout
    Bender_82: The Amazon
    Blastroid: Sackeratinator 3000
    Bluetonberry: Classic Zelda 1-1
    Chazprime: Donkey Kong (retro)
    Chicoleunis: Da Vinci's first handcrafted Factory
    Chimpanzee: Pegged 2
    CitrusRobot: The Great Forest: Moomamoomas
    Comphermc: Wizard Beta (work in progress)
    Crazy_Tito: Mystic Cave
    cRckls: !CALAVERA! Pinball
    Cuzfeeshe: Vectroids
    Deewtog12: Block Zombies
    Dethoptix: LittleBigZelda Engine V1.1
    Distinct-Creator: Fiore, A Relaxing Platformer
    DVCV92: Little Big Puzzles
    ElevenBane: Wooly Bully
    Exalted_Yawn: Ivory Tower - The Cascading Spire
    Fastbro: Frostbite DX
    Felkroth: Frozen Flame - Chapter 1 (part 1)
    Felkroth: Frozen Flame - Chapter 1 (part 2)
    Foggles: Aliens V Zombots
    Foofles: Maximum Carnage
    Fotosynthesis1: Spike World [Extended]
    Fyshokid: Stereo/mono 2
    Gevurah22: The Fist of Craft Earth
    Gevurah22 : Dragon Knight (work in progress)
    Gonflette: Realistic Pinball Simulation
    Gruntosuk: Geometry Wars
    Gruntosuk: Venice is sinking
    Gurichan: Pac-man
    Gyro_bot: Yeti Must Sleep!! V30
    Halestorm_6: Mini Golf (1-4 players)
    Hm83: Pinball Gold
    I_Pinky_I: Moon Lander 2
    Jaeyden: Dragon Slayer Part 1 & 2
    Jaslow: If Trees Could Speak
    JayveewII60: Here Kitty-Kitty (Movie)
    JayveewII60: Operation Rocking Chair! (Movie)
    Jiggycake: Block Planet
    Johnee: Blast Radius
    Jump_button: Side/Top Down Platfomer|8-BIT
    Jump_Button: Black & White Planet 3
    JustinArt: Tilt, Roll and Drop
    LadyIyn1: Zombird Apocalypse Preview
    L1ghtmare: Cyberstrata
    Last edited by cliffbo; 04-05-2011 at 06:09 PM.

  19. #19
    Uncharted4 Bliss's Avatar
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    For me it's fine like it is !
    ”Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.”

    Harriet Tubman.

  20. #20
    PSN: GribbleGrunger cliffbo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bliss View Post
    For me it's fine like it is !
    ok, i'll leave it as it is until i get a lot of the same creators and then put a heading before each level/levels

    ---------- Post added at 06:13 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:07 PM ----------

    Thanks to LucidMomentum over at LBPcentral

    Quote Originally Posted by LucidMomentum View Post
    Random Sequence/Object Emitter/Generator

    So, as I mentioned in the threads here and here, I've been working on my first LBP2 level (and my first level in general - wanted to show my little brother I could put something together for once ).

    So, the premise for my level is simple. Platformer, set at sunset, with different building heights and a grapple section where you swing through a building. The problem is, I knew there were a lot of levels similar to this (if not in style), so I wanted to be a bit more... Ambitious. So, I thought "I'll make 8 or so buildings, arrange them in 8 or so set patterns, and then have LBP2 randomly choose which sequence to use next in the level, so that way it's always different!"

    And so it began. Everything went well, up until the random generation part. I had all my emitters rigged, had the randomizer set, and timed everything up accordingly. But, I ran into a handful of problems:

    1. Randomizer wouldn't emit during the right time (it kept checking for when it had free space to drop something, not when I set it to)

    2. Emitter wouldn't emit when the randomizer selected it (a result of changing the settings to "emit once" from a randomizer set to "overide pattern", triggered by a timer.

    3. If the randomizer selected an emitter twice in a row, the emitter wouldn't register it as a new selection but rather a continuation of the old one, so it wouldn't even emit again.

    This gave me about a 1 in 8 chance of the level breaking - not good. However, after some forum help and a lot of thinking, I've come up with a rig that seems to generate exactly on time, and for the most part it is pretty random - although if it does select one object twice in a row, it won't break.

    Here's a picture of the rig:


    Now, since I've been hearing how frustrating this is for a lot of people, I thought I'd post some notes on it for now. I'll most likely give the rig away as a prize with my level, since I'm so proud of it, with notes and everything, but in the meantime, notes:

    Each of the emitters is set as such:
    -Emit Once

    -Each emitter is rigged to a counter, which activates it. The counters have a count of 1, default count 0, and have another output cable to reset it (mainly a failsafe more than anything - you probably don't need it but they were left over from another attempt and since it works I'm not complaining )

    The randomizer is set as such:
    -Input: On/Off (Unlike Override Pattern, this one won't leave a signal running through the cable if it is turned off.)
    -Emit: One at a time (to prevent duplicates / strange patterns)
    -Rigged to each emitter you want emitting something.

    The emitter is in turn rigged to a toggle output, which is triggered a direction combiner, and triggers a timer when toggled to on.

    The direction combiner takes two different inputs, one on and one off, for the toggle switch. The on toggle switch is triggered by a counter, which resets itself every time it is activated by a timer (this time is what will determine the intervals between random emitting.

    The off toggle switch is triggered by the timer that is triggered by the toggle switch itself, when set to on - this timer runs for longer than it takes the emitter to emit the object, but less than the total time between emit intervals (the lower the timer's time is, the better - that way you don't risk anything). For example, my sequences emit every 10 seconds or so, but the timer to trigger the off toggle switch once it's on is about 2 seconds. This timer resets itself each time it completes the timing.

    And so, that's basically how it works. It can randomly emit from any number of choices, and the whole rig took up about 3-4 notches of temp meter (although once it emits something, take that into account - so, no emitting more than what would overheat the level, for instance).

    So to recap, it works like so:

    Timer counts intervals between emitting
    ->Count activates Toggle Switch
    ->Toggle Switch Activates Randomizer & Timer 2
    ->Randomizer is set to run, chooses counter which is rigged to one of the emitters, for a one time emit
    ->Timer 2 counts down, between randomizer choice and next emit interval
    ->Timer 2 deactivates Toggle Switch
    -> Timer switch cuts signal to Randomizer, which cuts signal to emitter
    Timer finishes waiting for the next interval

    Rinse, repeat.

    If anyone has any questions or comments, feel free to leave them. If not, I plan to upload the level in the next week or so.
    Cheers!
    Did you know that...

    ...One interesting little thing I've been experimenting with is the "signal strength" output type on game cameras, specifically, using them as follow-cams on sackbots or vehicles, but making 5 different follow-cams instead of one.

    There is a "middle" camera, which is just set to a straight-on, flat angle of whatever the player is controlling, and is activated by default. But there are 4 other cameras, set to identical zoom as the middle-cam, but angled in the four cardinal directions (ie, one camera is "looking" to the left, one up, etc). Then you hook the outputs of the controlinator's sixaxis up to directional splitters, and hook them up to their respective cameras.

    So what you get is a camera that will follow whatever you're controlling, but change angle depending on which way and how far you're tilting your controller. And guess what? You can even do three, six, even eighteen of these setups in microchips that are all activated by a single selector, so you can have a whole bunch of different zoom levels that all change angle with the controller tilt.

    It had pretty neat results when I tested it, if anybody else wants to try I'd love to hear what you do with it.

    ...Tags can be wired up and therefore be activated? No more need to emit tags like in LBP1.

    ...instead of 8 unique tag/tag sensor combinations like in LBP1, the number of combinations are now endless? All you need to do is set a label on your tag and match it at the tag sensor to create a unique pair. The colors are there just for overview and organization. Unlabeled tags of one color still set off unlabeled sensors of the same color, though.

    ...Selectors are ideal for switching between phases of logic on an object? Instead of complex NOT and AND gate magic, throw a Selector in there, hook up the triggers of each phase to its inputs and the output to its corresponding effects.

    ...you can stick microchips on the circuit boards of existing microchips and organize your logic that way?

    ...you can enable and disable entire subsections of logic by putting them on a separate microchip and connecting a wire to that chip?

    ...most logic objects (Timers, Selectors, Sequencers, Microchips, most Movers and Rotators, Object Tweakers and Randomizers) do not require an active input but are set to ON per default unless they are wired up? This is useful when you have a dozen of effects happening at a certain decision point: instead of wiring them all up separately, stick 'em to a separate microchip and just activate the chip instead!

    ...you can not control the position on a Sequencer at the same time as switching it on? But there is a trick: stick the Sequencer (set to Positional) on a separate Microchip, hook up its input with whatever controls its position (a Counter or Timer...) and have another action turn on the microchip the Sequencer is sitting on.

    ....a NOT gate, set to Inverted and its output wired to its own input, can act as a very fast pulsing signal? You can then hook up its output to for instance a light or Halo material to make it blink faster than a timer could.

    ...a Counter set to maximum 1 can act as a memory switch? Once switched on, it stays on until something else sends a signal to its reset input. This is different from the Toggle switch in that the Toggle will be triggered whenever a new signal arrives and a Counter won't.
    Thanks to Brandio over at LBPcentral

    How to record an attack

    well thanks to Brandio's way to record an attack, heres a tutorial on how to record an attack
    Well since im not exactly sure how you want your atk to work ill explain how i made my sackbot do a punch atk and hopefully that will help. First make a behavior chip and record the punch animation however you want it to look. Then Hook up the output of the button you want to trigger the atk in to a counter with max count at 1. Then hook that counter up to the behavior chip. You will probably also want to hook it up to a sound and an emitter to emit an invisible thing of holo with a tag on it so the enemies know when they are getting hit. Then make a timer with a max time around .3 secounds or something near that. Then make the timer reset its self and the counter and make it so the counter triggers the timer. Hope that helped.
    But he forgot to mention one part. When after you connected everything, connect the timers output to the normal behavior chip of the sackbot so it wont be stuck just slapping and staying in one place. What that does it allows you to punch without your sackbot going all crazy and going back to where he was recorded.


    ---------- Post added at 06:47 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:13 PM ----------

    Thanks to Rtm223 over at LBPcentral

    Waste Not, Want Not: Part 1

    Waste Not, Want Not:
    Resource Sharing for Thermofficiency!

    - Part 1 -

    1. Roadmap for the Next Month
    Last week I brought out those winch-based AND and OR gates (again ) and said "these are the most thermo efficient in the game". To my knowledge this is true, but it's a very, very short-sighted statement. If all you want is an AND or an OR in isolation then they're awesome, but very rarely do I use logic gates on their own. It's far more common to see them as part of a network, and this gives us further opportunities to cut down on thermo.

    So today and continuing on to the next couple of blogs, we will be looking at ways to optimise networks. The idea is to share resources between multiple (2-4 ish) switches, to optimise sections of networks beyond what can be done at individual gate level. I'll then be rounding off the whole thing with a worked example, In which I will take a real logic system and reduce the thermo by around 40%, so be assured that it's pretty nifty stuff. Some of it also has the nice side effect of reducing the switching time (latency) of your networks, so there's lots of win to be had.

    geekNotes - On Thermo Categories

    Hopefully most of you are aware of this but the thermo is split into several categories. Each of these has a certain amount of space in it and if a single one becomes full your level will overheat. The important implication of this is that even if one category is on the verge of bursting, you can still add to the others - as long as you don't touch the maxed out one.

    The categories that are most important to logic are:

    1. Total number of objects in the Level
    2. Number of moving objects in the level
    3. Number of vertices in the level (Complex Shapes) - nixed for now (see section 4)
    4. Collected Objects (which includes keys / switches / emitters and connectors)
    5. Connectors (this appears to be a separate category to collected objects. Pistons etc. contribute to both)


    These are resources that need to be managed for effective level creation, anything that can be removed for logic can be utilised for extra playing area, more detailed environments, or even more logic

    That's all I have to say within the blog, for further info on the thermo and thermo management, check out the Comph-rehensive Thermo Overview and Guide, which in turn links to the MM video on the subject
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    2. Sharing Logic Switches

    OK, this one is literally as simple as it gets. Occasionally you will find yourself creating 2 switches that are functionally the same (i.e. two AND gates with the same inputs). Typically this will happen in two different networks in the same area of your level. If you ever spot yourself doing this then see if it's sensible to just use one switch for both applications rather than having both.

    In addition to the times when you might accidentally create duplicate switches, you can sometimes force this to occur. A formal discussion on rearranging logic is well beyond the scope of this blog (maybe future blog?), but I'm sure you are well aware that there is always multiple solutions to a logic problem, so you might be able to fiddle things to create duplicate switches within your level and then reuse them.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    3. Sharing Dark Matter

    Typically we make our logic as a bunch of switches and we then wire them up. Each "switch" in network is likely to have a number of moving parts and a piece of dark matter, as shown below (left) with a couple of arbitrary AND / OR switches. To me, it does seem awfully decadent to give each switch its own piece of dark matter, so I like to merge it into one object (right).





    OK, so I know this one isn't going to save much thermo, but it also requires almost no effort on your part. In a pure logic level you are unlikely to be fussed about this, but in a "proper level", you can use that extra objects thermo you've freed up for a bit more detail here and there around the level.

    This methodology also has a benefit of keeping your logic organised. Grouping a logic network by merging the dark matter it uses is a nice way to explicitly remind yourself that group of switches work together.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    4. Cutting Corners


    /sniped!

    So, this was going to be about cutting down your logic parts into neat little triangles, the theory being that less vertices means less complex shapes thermo. However, my cursory test showed this is not always the case. The test is highly inconclusive and needs a lot more more work, so as far as I'm concerned, the jury is still out on this one. Keep an eye on that thread for further updates.

    I'm gonna be sticking to nice neat little rectangles for the time-being. It offends my eyes less anyway
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    5. Sharing Magnetic Keys.

    My mental model of magnetic keys is that they activate when you move a magnetic key into their radius. For this reason, I often make switches where the magnetic switch sits on a piece of dark matter and you move a magnetic key in and out of range. But what if we swap that around and move the switch and keep the key static? Well, there is no difference, the following two switches will work in exactly the same manner:



    However, if we have multiple switches, we can neatly delete all but one of those magnetic keys and have the same functional devices:



    Again, this is another simple technique that can be used throughout your logic design. There are some devices where it's harder to use this (simple examples are XORs and Toggles that often need a moving magnetic key), but if you can do a quick redesign on your device so it has a single static key, then it leads to an easy method for saving thermo in the long run.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    6. Using Multiple Outputs

    So sometimes your switches are going to need to output more than one signal from your switches and sometimes these signals will be of different types (by types I mean directional, on/off, etc). You might be using some kind of "converter" device to create these multiple signals, but I doubt it. Typically this will involve using two magnetic keys instead of one, as shown below:



    If you are using converters, then you should probably ditch them. They are really useful for outputting multiple signals from levers and buttons, but not within your logic networks. However, beyond the multiple magnetic switches, there isn't much you can do to reduce thermo if you need multiple signal types. However, a while back I found out that, in some cases, I thought I needed multiple signal types when in fact I didn't. As it turns out, the following devices will (counter-intuitively) take directional inputs, as well as the more obvious on/off and/or one-shot signals:

    * Music Objects
    * Sound Objects
    * Magic Mouths
    * GLTs
    * Rockets

    I never, ever thought to try it, so I didn't know. I figured there might be a couple of you out there that are in the same position. I use a lot of sounds, magic mouths and cameras controlled by logic systems and this knowledge actually saves me a fair number of magnetic switches.

    Note that these objects will always treat outwards direction as on. Unlike the connectors, you cannot do inversion at the destination (i.e. using backwards setting on connectors). Just something to bear in mind.


    ---------- Post added at 07:01 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:47 PM ----------

    Thanks to Rtm223 over at LBPcentral

    Waste Not, Want Not: Part 2

    1. Input Sharing

    This week is going to be all about shared inputs in logic networks. It's a really useful technique and has the potential to save a fair bit of thermo in the right circumstances. The idea is that often a signal in a logic network will input to multiple devices. In this case, it can be beneficial to construct our logic in such a way that we use this to our advantage.

    One thing to note is that the "inputs" in this case don't have to be the inputs to the network. They are the inputs to individual switches within the network, so could be signals in the middle of your logic network, coming from other logic devices (i.e the output signal of one device becomes the input signal of multiple other devices).

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    2. Input Sharing with AND and OR Gates

    Often, you will find yourself having need for a variety of devices that all share a common input. Often this could be a "player is in a certain area", or an "enable" type signal, but I'll just deal with it in an abstract manner for now.

    2.1. Basic Input Sharing
    The following is an example of three logical functions that share a common input (s):

    a•s (a AND s)
    b+s (b OR s)
    c•s (c AND s)


    If we build some basic, piston-driven, switches for this, we can see that the s signals all move together. As demonstrated by the logic system on the right, sharing that input by having a single moving part with a magnetic key on it is more efficient:



    In this case, the way I laid out the logic makes it easy to see that this can be done, in reality it's often less obvious that you have an input that could be reused. The trick, as with all of these techniques, is spotting opportunities to use it when creating your logic for real.

    2.2. Comparison with Winch Logic

    If we make the same functions with 3 winch-based devices, then we can do a quick comparison of efficiency and decide which is "best":



    Note the use of a shared magnetic magnetic key technique, from last week.

    Code:

    Code:
    Component     |  Shared Input  |  Winch  |
    ----------------|----------------|---------|
      Objects       |        5       |    4    |  
      Moving Parts  |        4       |    3    |
      Mag Switches  |        3       |    3    |
      Mag Keys      |        1       |    1    |
      Connectors    |        4       |    6    |
    --------------------------------------------

    As you can see, the component counts work out so that the winches method has less moving parts, but the shared inputs method uses less collected objects. Due to the fact that we have multiple separate thermos, whatever is "best" will depend on what level you are creating and what resources you are likely to need elsewhere. For example, my current project is going to annihilate collected objects thermo before anything else, and I have to copy the logic systems many times. In that case, saving the connectors at the expense of a moving part is clearly preferable.

    Often it's not a clear cut as that though, but knowing multiple techniques that optimise thermo in different ways is always a bonus. If you aren’t sure what your level’s requirements are going to be, you could always just alternate techniques you use through the level as resource levelling exercise. The best way to get the most out of the thermo is to max out as many different thermos as possible!

    Something else to note here is that if you are sharing inputs between n switches, the rise in moving parts is always 1, the rise in connectors will be (n-1). So the more sharing you can do on that one signal, the more thermo you can save by not using winches and so the more likely that will be the preferable route.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    3. Sharing Inputs with XORs

    The example above kind of saves us thermo, but because of the efficiency of winch ANDs and ORs it's a bit iffy. There are a few examples where such techniques will always save us thermo and one of those is the XOR.

    geekNotes: On the XOR Function

    In case you are unsure, the 2-input XOR will activate it's output if exactly 1 of it's inputs is TRUE. If neither of input is TRUE or both inputs are TRUE, the the output goes to FALSE.

    Code:
    Code:
    
          a  |  b  || Out | 
        -----|-----||-----|
          0  |  0  ||  0  |
          0  |  1  ||  1  |
          1  |  0  ||  1  |
          1  |  1  ||  0  |
        -------------------
    
        If you have more than two inputs to your XOR, it activates if an odd number of them are active (1, 3, 5, etc). I recently found out a method to make 3 + input XORs quite neatly by stacking Wobble Bolts on top of each other and rotating 90 degrees for each input. However, it's a bit of a wide tangent for today, even for me. It was just nice to find something wobbles can do better than pistons and winches.
    
        Who'd've thunk it?
    
        Don't worry, I have no intention of signing up to the Wobble Logic Revolution (gedit?), winches are still my favourites
    I make my XORs like the image below and I currently have no design that is more efficient (if anyone does, then feel free to wing it my way ):



    If we had multiple XORs sharing an input, then we could put a magnetic key on the shared input and magnetic switches on the non-shared inputs. This is scalable to (pretty much) as many as you like, such as the example below of 8 XORs all sharing a input signal (useful if you want to conditionally invert a whole bank of signals):

    a + s (a XOR s)
    a + s (a XOR s)
    ....
    h + s (h XOR s)

    Again, we configure the logic so that the magnetic key is on the shared input and we get the following:



    3.2. XORs Sharing with Other Devices
    Of course, you don't have to share between XORs and other XORs. You will also find that sharing an input between an XOR and a number of AND / OR gates will also save thermo against using a winch-based OR. Consider the following:

    a + s (a XOR s)
    b • s (b AND s)

    We have a 2 input AND and a 2 input XOR. Below is the shared input configuration for this:



    It should be clear that this saves resources over the alternative of a separate XOR and a winch-based AND.

    geekNotes: On Human Error

    Well that's not exactly the example I was planning on showing you. It was supposed to be a 3 input AND and and XOR. But I sort of forgot to do the pictures for that

    To rebuild that circuit above with a 3-input AND and a 2 input XOR, you can replace the left hand side with a 2-input AND and then use the magnetic key on the right as the third input. As per the example above, this reduces your thermo against having two separate gates.

    It's a little awkward, as you have to play around with mag key radius and inversions to get it working, but the point is that these techniques aren't just limited to 2-input devices. In fact, this example is very close to next week's subject matter, so I'm sure all will become clear after that
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    4. Sharing inputs with Inversion:

    Another configuration where we can definitely save thermo is using ANDs and ORs with inversion. I've actually got a practical example of this one: in Setbacks, when you get to the elevator and use the console, a magic mouth tells you you need to turn on the generator. Once you have activated the generator, you come back and the console initiates the elevator movement. This is quite a common gameplay device IMO and also a very nice little example. Using the symbols c (for console) and g (for generator on), we have the following logic system to design:

    (c • !g) -> mouth
    (c • g) -> elevator

    We can share c quite easily, as before, but that g is harder to share, because in one case we need to invert the piston, so we would end up treating g and !g as different signals, within the switch:



    An alternative to this is to create a weird perpendicular configuration of an AND gate. In the animation below, c is moving vertically and g is moving horizontally. If c is FALSE, then both of the magnetic switches will be FALSE. When c becomes TRUE, one of the magnetic switches will become TRUE, depending on the value of g.



    It should be clear from inspection that, in this case, the collected objects and connectors thermos are reduced vs a winch-based design (two winch ANDs) and all else is equal. Personally I find this one very useful - it's a common thing I'd use in actual gameplay logic, even if it is normally for magic mouths and camera control.

    Of course this could be used with ORs, or if you are careful with your inversions, any combination of ANDs / ORs / NANDs / NORs on the two signals and their inverses.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    5. Summary

    So that's input sharing. This is far from an exhaustive list of where it can be applied, just a subset of the possible scenarios that I thought were most likely to come up / easy to demonstrate. It's far less easy to implement than the ideas from last week as you have to really make decisions on when it's applicable / useful within your own levels.

    5.1. The downsides:

    The more savvy amongst you will have noticed that some of these techniques are impossible (or nearly impossible) to use together. I'd love to be able to just give you a run down of rules to follow that would automatically turn your logic networks into optimal designs, but I can't One thing to bear in mind is that having the absolutely bestest design ever is not entirely needed. Simply by incorporating more techniques into your existing repertoire will give you more options and that alone will lead to more thermo-efficient designs.

    There is one time where getting the absolute lowest thermo design is important: When the logic must be duplicated many times. Saving one winch on a logic system is nothing major - probably not worth the time for a rebuild from the ground up. Saving one winch in a logic system that you are going to use 20 times probably is.

    the stuff above is very advanced and as such, very complex. i'll post links to the blog here and in the first post for the serious LBPlaneters amongst you


    LBP2: Analogue Logic [Part 1]: Concepts and Fundamentals
    Analogue Logic (supplemental) - Notation
    Analogue Logic 2: Sorting and Addition
    Analogue Logic 3: Analogue - Digital Conversion (ADC) & Digital to Analogue Conversion (DAC)
    Analogue Logic 4 - Basics of Sampling & Scaling
    Analogue Logic 5 - Division & Multiplication

    ---------- Post added at 08:07 PM ---------- Previous post was at 07:01 PM ----------

    Jump_Button is working on a top down platformer called 8-BIT: Side/Top Down Platfomer (evidently it's up for playtesting now)





    ---------- Post added at 09:44 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:07 PM ----------

    looks like the MOVE pack for LBP2 will contain new levels

    Question:*name deleted for privacy reasons*: In time, after we have created many great levels, will there be a DLC pack that is as big as Metal Gear and Pirates pack? (Paintinator and Water).
    Answer from Spaff:Almost certainly, but I can't tell you what yet The Move pack will contain some new story mode levels using Move controls made by us here, the guys are working on it at the moment, it's looking great!
    Last edited by cliffbo; 02-07-2011 at 07:50 PM.

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