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frosty
09-28-2006, 03:06 AM
I've noticed some confusion on these boards over the various HD resolutions and framerates, as well as what each type of video connector is capable of. So, this thread is to put that confusion to rest.

Note: this comparison doesn't include PAL resolutions. I will update it later to add those.

480i

This is 720x480 which is displayed at 60 half frames per second. The NTSC standard has it start off drawing even lines first, (line 2,4,6,8,etc.) on the first 1/60 frame, and odd on the next. Phosphors on CRT monitors continue to glow after they are drawn on while the scan line draws the next line, so you don't see a black flicker on the screen. LCD's and plasmas have to employ some sort of de-interlacing technique in order to display 480i. 480i can produce interlace flicker and artifacts if there is motion between one 1/60 frame to the next. In order to display a 24 fps movie, 3:2 pulldown is required to adapt it to 30 fps.

Types of connectors capable of carrying 480i: composite, s-video, component, DVI, HDMI, coaxial, VGA

480p

This is a 720x480 image that runs at 30-60 frames per second, however it displays the entire image in every frame. 3:2 pulldown is still required for 24 fps if using the NTSC standard. It is possible to send a true 24 fps 480p image though.

Types of connectors that can carry 480p: Component, DVI, HDMI, VGA

720p

This displays a 1280x720 image at 24, 30, or 60 full frames per second.

Types of connectors that carry this image: component, DVI, HDMI, VGA

1080i

Displays a 1920x1080 image at 60 interlaced half frames per second, or 48 half frames for 24 fps. Interlacing starts on odd frames instead of even with NTSC.

Types of connectors that can carry this image: component, DVI, HDMI, VGA

1080p

Highest resolution available today. Displays a 1920x1080 image at 60, 30, or 24 full frames per second.

Types of connectors that carry this image: Component (limited to 24 or 30 fps) DVI, HDMI, VGA

Xbox 360's 1080p output is limited to 30 fps over it's component, though if you use VGA 1080p60 is possible.

Playstation 3 comes ready to support all of the above modes right out of the box with both models.

Nintendo Wii supports up to 480p over composite, component, or s-video.

Beenie Man
09-28-2006, 03:08 AM
^I'm afraid a little since I am going to buy a 720p Bravia, but after the amazing reports of how the games looked on the 1080p screens, I won't get the same experience and I do not want to buy a 50''+ 1080p to see the advantage of 1080p as it costs too much money. Could anyone tell me if 720p is spectacular.

frosty
09-28-2006, 03:12 AM
720p is comparable to a computer monitor running at 1024x768, so play a computer game at that resolution and that's what you get (roughly). It consists of 921,600 pixels, vs. 2, 073,600 pixels for 1080p. So, as you can see 1080p offers more than twice the resolution of 720p.

PUNK em 733
09-28-2006, 03:16 AM
^I'm afraid a little since I am going to buy a 720p Bravia, but after the amazing reports of how the games looked on the 1080p screens, I won't get the same experience and I do not want to buy a 50''+ 1080p to see the advantage of 1080p as it costs too much money. Could anyone tell me if 720p is spectacular.


720P I would think would be fine, you might not get all the nice details, and overall nice pic of a 1080P, but that's too be expected. But really many 1080P tv's aren't as expensive as you think...look at Westinghouse's new line of 1080P Tvs that are not bad pricewise. I saw a 61" Toshiba DLP 1080P at costco, for about 2400, and after the holidays I know it's going down in price.

So what's the next great leap in HD resolution after 1080P?

Viper
09-28-2006, 03:17 AM
Beenie, the difference in 720p and 1080p is dependant on TV size (at least in terms of human perspective). If the TV is smaller than 40", you won't see much difference. Only at 40", or higher really, does 1080p show it's true value.

BahnNZ
09-28-2006, 03:17 AM
Thing about your modern TV is they give you 720p... And a little bit extra. This Bravia is 1360, above 720p(1280). So you feed it 1080i or 1080p(Presuming it supports 1080p) you get noticeably better picture than 720p, but not all the way to True HD.

Just great for watching movies in 1080p like the one I just watched on Blu Ray. Smoochie boochies, Morris Day and the Time motherf***ers!

...

It was Jay & Silent Bob. Blu Ray movies are looking better these days.

frosty
09-28-2006, 03:17 AM
So what's the next great leap in HD resolution after 1080P?

2k x 4k, or 8 million pixels.


Beenie, the difference in 720p and 1080p is dependant on TV size (at least in terms of human perspective). If the TV is smaller than 40", you won't see much difference. Only at 40", or higher really, does 1080p show it's true value.


I'll have to respectfully disagree here, as my 21 inch computer monitor is 1680x1050, or about 400k pixels short of 1080p but 800k pixels more than 720p. You can see a clear difference on it between 720p and 1080p video.


However, you do sit a good bit closer to a monitor than a TV, so I can see where you come from.

PUNK em 733
09-28-2006, 03:21 AM
2k x 4k, or 8 million pixels.

WHOAA! When should we expect this? That is a crazy leap.

frosty
09-28-2006, 03:23 AM
Sony already has 2kx4k projectors on the market, thing is there isn't a video format in place yet to take advantage of it (nor is there a connection format, you would have to use multiple DVI or HDMI ports for one image). With these 100GB and up Blu-Ray discs coming out, there should be plenty of storage space to accomidate it with the right codec.

xbdestroya
09-28-2006, 03:33 AM
'2K' - as the resolution is known - is presently high-end movie theatre targeted equipment. I wouldn't worry about it on the TV for a while Pumk 'em. ;)

And it's already used in several hundred theatres actually.

frosty
09-28-2006, 03:34 AM
I wouldn't see it in the home for another 7-10 years. It's cost is very prohibitive and the tech to support it doesn't really exist at the moment (for the home user, that is).

aclar00
09-28-2006, 03:34 AM
'2K' - as the resolution is known - is presently high-end movie theatre targeted equipment. I wouldn't worry about it on the TV for a while Pumk 'em. ;)

And it's already used in several theatres actually.

I thought that was ultra high def... guess not though because i dont recall there ever being any mention of it being used in movie theatres

frosty
09-28-2006, 03:36 AM
The highest tech theaters out there use it. It's actually said to simulate the resolution of actual film, but all digitally so there are no scratches and such on the image anymore.

BahnNZ
09-28-2006, 03:50 AM
Jah, this is PS4 stuff.

xbdestroya
09-28-2006, 03:51 AM
I thought that was ultra high def... guess not though because i dont recall there ever being any mention of it being used in movie theatres

Ok, me and Frosty are talking about different things... and I think you've been caught in the crossfire Aclar! :) He's talking about '4K,' which indeed is what you're terming as 'ultra high-def,' where as I'm talking about 2K, a little higher than 1080p and the current high-end 'norm' for digital theatres.

4K is definitely the new beast of resolution, and is slowly being adopted by certain theatres (it's expensive!)

frosty
09-28-2006, 04:04 AM
OK, yeah he's right. 2k isn't much better than 1080p at all, it only increases the 1920 to 2048. A negligable difference. 2kx4k is where it's at. The former is for theaters to display movies shot in a "wider screen" (the widescreen movies that still letterbox when displayed on a 16:9 TV) and is basically the same as 1080p.

For those interested in reading up on 2k x 4k projectors, here's Sony's.

http://news.ecoustics.com/bbs/messages/10381/170722.html

Top of the line if you have 67'000 euros ($85,230) to spend on one.

curryking1
09-28-2006, 05:58 AM
Isn't 720p resolution 1280 x 720 pixels? 1280 x 720 pixels is very sharp for games on a computer monitor, and if 720p is in fact 1280 x 720, 720p should be a good option for people who just want to balance the cost more effectively with the product they get.

frosty
09-28-2006, 06:00 AM
1280x720 isn't much higher than 1024x768, which is pretty much a standard resolution for PC monitors. Windows XP doesn't let you go below 800x600, for example, so it's really only a click higher than XP's lowest resolution setting. It's about 540,000 pixels higher than standard definition, but over a million pixels less than 1080p.

Smokey
09-28-2006, 09:57 AM
ok i bought a 1024x1080 hitachi 42inch plasma today (beautiful picture :)). isnt the second lot of numbers (1080) the important ones. there was a 116cm LCD 1920x1080 (sony) there but it was 8Gs a little bit out of reach at the moment lol

frosty
09-28-2006, 10:41 AM
no, both numbers are equally important. It's about on par with 720p if you factor in pixel count, but the pixels aren't in aspect, so you won't even get that resolution out of them. I wonder how the TV can have that resoluiton and still be widescreen, because that violates the 16:9 aspect ratio. 1024x1080 is pretty much square, it doesn't even fit SDTV's aspect ratio (rectangular) at 4:3.

woundingchaney
09-28-2006, 10:46 AM
1024x1080, hmmm never heard of that res. before. I dont think it is common in pc gaiming either.

What brand/model do you have Smoke??

But anyways kudos on the set, Hitatchi for the last few years has made excellent tvs. Actually most the major manufacturers are stepping up like: Hitatchi, Panasonic, Sony, Samsung.

LOL- Im rambling now.

Smokey
09-28-2006, 10:49 AM
I wonder how the TV can have that resoluiton and still be widescreen
yeah i know it is WS 16:9 though and i know wounding said not to buy 1024x1024 but it has a coupla extra lines lol. but me and the missus went and looked and it had the best pic there out of dozens plasmas at different stores :) and my mate has a 1024x1024 and it was great. they have a real depth to em in 1080i. itll do me till 1920x1080p get into the 3-4Gs here for 42inch+

Smokey
09-28-2006, 10:49 AM
yeah wounding its Hitachi :) and they do have wierd resolutions

EDIT: and the sound just blows me away

woundingchaney
09-28-2006, 10:51 AM
yeah wounding its Hitachi :) and they do have wierd resolutions
I wouldnt worry about it too much, just like in gaiming people get all frustrated with numbers and what now. As you said the main component is PQ and that you have HDMI (LOL).

frosty
09-28-2006, 10:56 AM
Looked into it, and that's the highest resolution plasmas are capable of hitting. Plasma pixels are rectangular in nature, so they can have a 1024x1080 resolution and still hit widescreen. It is not, however, 1080i or p. At best you're getting 720p slightly upscaled. However, there are some true 1080 sets that won't produce as stable of an image, even though their overall resolution is sharper. It still won't best a good 1080p LCD though.

Smokey
09-28-2006, 10:57 AM
at the moment just using RGB15pin-Dsub so i will have to get a HDbox with HDMI (it has 2) and the PS3 has its own HDMI :). thanks wounding :):)

KEY FEATURES
World First 1080 Line 42" Plasma Panel
HD Ready (requires HDTV Digital Set Top Box)
1024 x 1080 Resolution
60,000 hour panel life (under normal video use)*
1,400cd/m2 Panel Brightness
4,000:1 Contrast Ratio
68.6 Billion Colours
170 Degree Viewing Angle
Built-in twin analogue tuners
Multi-Picture (PinP, Split, PonP4, PonP12)
Aspect ratio mode (Panoramic, Zoom, Cinema, Full, 4:3)
Teletext (Fastext with 100 page memory)
Built-in HiFi quality speakers (10 speaker, 36W)
SRS WOW / BBE Sound
VGA-UXGA input for PC
Twin Component inputs (DVD/STB)
Twin HDMI digital inputs
SD Card + USB Photo Inputs
Headphone Output
Remote Control Swivel Desk Stand
Fanless Design for Silent Operation
Slim Space Saving Design
12 months warranty

http://aus.hitachi.com.au/hitachi/content/template_products.asp?ID=1835

woundingchaney
09-28-2006, 10:58 AM
Man have you guys seen the dramatic cost difference in 1080p rear proj sets and standard sets. Its ridiculous you can get a 37" for about 3500 - 4000 USD or a reap projection 42" - 50" for 2500-3000 USD.

woundingchaney
09-28-2006, 11:03 AM
Hey smoke you should do some of that pimped out wall hanging shit man. I run wall hangs on both my monitors and its great, although my lcd is too big for it. Though since you have a plasma it shouldnt be much of a problem for you.

Check this out -


http://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h108/woundingchaney/P1000216.jpg


Yeah I know I need to clean up.

Smokey
09-28-2006, 11:04 AM
sony lcd 116 cm 1920x1080 "true HD" 7500AU

EDIT: yeah i should wounding it has an electrical swivel base, which is cool, but not sure about its stableness LOL

Smokey
09-28-2006, 11:14 AM
lol clean up mate LOL looks great though wounding. shit man ima jealous i have an old 15inch fatty for me computers lol. i want to hook up me new dualcore ;) to the new hitachi :)

new plasma
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y79/BFG-SMOKEY7/DSCF5158.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y79/BFG-SMOKEY7/DSCF5157.jpg

old plasma (now in bedroom LOL)
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y79/BFG-SMOKEY7/DSCF5160.jpg

computer screen lol
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y79/BFG-SMOKEY7/DSCF5159.jpg

woundingchaney
09-28-2006, 11:16 AM
lol clean up mate LOL looks great though wounding. shit man ima jealous i have an old 15inch fatty for me computers lol. i want to hook up me new dualcore ;) to the new hitachi :)
Yeah let me know when you get that man. It should be there the end of this week or beginning of next week.

frosty
09-28-2006, 11:30 AM
Here's a 42' 1080p set for under $2,400 (http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_SessionID=@@@@1947991300.1159439350@ @@@&BV_EngineID=cckkaddimfhfgikcefecemldffidfmg.0&vertical=SEARS&sid=I0093600040004300085&pid=05771426000)

^looked into it, it isn't true 1080p. It simply de-interlaces 1080i to display 1080p. What a waste! (could probably be hacked to take a 1080p signal though, since it's screen is actually capable of true 1080p)

Here's another one (http://www.fadfusion.com/selection.php?product_item_number=20204000050)

and yet another one, this one is 60 in' (http://froogle.google.com/froogle_url?q=http://www.hotbuyselectronics.com/item_detail.php%3Fitem_id%3D112104&fr=AKZjh4qUTLNfaMsBrPYAuqFnLfxZfpgBaY3SBgawOTXoRc0 vFwBOBWAbDEJoN9j99AAAAAAAAAAA&gl=us&hl=en)

So, for LCD, 1080p is pricey, but DLP 62' TV's are within reach.

Z
09-28-2006, 11:35 AM
so I am between getting a "46 or a 50" 1080p TV. the thing is, I am afraid that a screen too big will start to effect the image quality.
so, you think 50" is better than 46"?

that and, I saw a Samsung semi-thin CRT TV that is taunted to go true 1080p. if that happens, hellaluja!
I expect then to be hals the price of LCDs.

frosty
09-28-2006, 11:37 AM
Actually, with 1080p, the bigger the TV, the more you will notice the jump in resolution. Movie theaters that have 2k projectors pump out an image that is only very slightly higher in pixel count than 1080p (2048x1080 vs 1920x1080)

Smokey
09-28-2006, 11:45 AM
Here's a 42' 1080p set for under $2,400 (http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_SessionID=@@@@1947991300.1159439350@ @@@&BV_EngineID=cckkaddimfhfgikcefecemldffidfmg.0&vertical=SEARS&sid=I0093600040004300085&pid=05771426000)

^looked into it, it isn't true 1080p.

Here's another one (http://www.fadfusion.com/selection.php?product_item_number=20204000050)

and yet another one, this one is 60 in' (http://froogle.google.com/froogle_url?q=http://www.hotbuyselectronics.com/item_detail.php%3Fitem_id%3D112104&fr=AKZjh4qUTLNfaMsBrPYAuqFnLfxZfpgBaY3SBgawOTXoRc0 vFwBOBWAbDEJoN9j99AAAAAAAAAAA&gl=us&hl=en)

So, for LCD, 1080p is pricey, but DLP 62' TV's are within reach.
but here in aus LCDs are dear as piss. and ive never been a fan or liked (hated actually) rear pros. they are probabaly better now but every one ive seen had a shit picture (not dissen anyone:() they never really took off here at all, and i just love that PLASMA name LOL

frosty
09-28-2006, 11:47 AM
Well, for a 720p+ set, you won't get better. Your plasma will outright spank any 720p set out there, bar none. It's color quality owns 720p outright. It's even suited for deep color (if it has HDMI 1.3) as it's capable of over 60 billion colors.

Garfunkel
09-28-2006, 12:20 PM
my bro has a 112cm DLP, it is shit, you have to sit at exactly eye level or it looks unwatchable.

hey wounding, is that a viewsonic vx2025wm on the left?, same one as mine.

EDIT: haha, and the x-530's!

hey69
09-28-2006, 01:53 PM
hm, makes you wonder,
sell my BMW and buy a tv or keep the car :p

Garfunkel
09-28-2006, 01:55 PM
tv, no question.

Yo MaMa84
09-28-2006, 03:06 PM
So what's the next great leap in HD resolution after 1080P?


http://www.cdfreaks.com/news2.php?ID=8067
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultra_High_Definition_Video

Viano
09-28-2006, 04:32 PM
playing bluray on REGZA, yup.

PUNK em 733
09-28-2006, 07:02 PM
Preliminary response of the UHDV was somewhat negative. This was not because of the lack of the promised technology, but more in the fact that it was too good. Some viewers got motion sickness when viewing the video image because the image was so close to reality.


HOLY SHIT!!


Hey Frosty, what do you think about this 62" Toshiba DLP 1080P....

http://www.amazon.com/Toshiba-62HM196-1080p-DLP-HDTV/dp/B000FEJNLI

Esp for gaming.

Yo MaMa84
09-28-2006, 08:08 PM
^^
Yea, your eyes see the very define video of motion, so your brain translate it to be real motion. But without the actual feeling of motion. So you get nauseous. (I think thats how it works....but not sure. Anyone as a different view of this)

Z
09-28-2006, 08:36 PM
I think those who get motion sickness from watching anything on TV are because they aren't used to seeing fast-moving images. we gamers are used to it since we were kids. ;p

frosty
09-28-2006, 08:53 PM
I don't have time to look over the TV at the moment, but just look for these features and keep these points in mind:

HDMI: (especially HDMI 1.3, though most DLP sets can't hit the color needed for it)

TRUE 1080p: Many market themselves as 1080p, but when you read the spec sheet you find the max res they support as an input is 1080i, which is then de-interlaced into 1080p. (Which really is a bunch of crap, because ALL 1080i DLP,LCD, LCD projection, and plasma sets de-interlace any interlaced image before they display it)

Brightness and clarity: Buy your TV in person. Never online. I've seen TV's that should have looked amazing on paper, but sucked in person. And Vice Versa.

woundingchaney
09-28-2006, 10:47 PM
As a side note, I know of a few and read many complaints of gaming on DLP televisions. I have no idea if these issues (scaling problems, refresh problems, etc) have been solved with current sets but it should be a concern if you wish to use your tv for gaming.



-these probs. are mainly associated with the Samsung series, but I would be cautious of all DLPS, although most likely these are non-issues now.

frosty
09-28-2006, 11:59 PM
^well, I used to game on my DLP front projector all the time without issue, so it may not be all DLP sets.

ded5850
09-29-2006, 12:11 AM
I'm a poor college student, and don't currently have the need, nor the resources to afford a 1080p set quite yet. However, this doesn't stop me from looking at a couple. ;) I was wondering if anyone could evaluate these Westinghouse models:

https://www.westinghousedigital.com/pc-51-2-27-lcd-hdtv.aspx

https://www.westinghousedigital.com/pc-56-7-37-1080p-monitor.aspx

Both run about $700 and $1500, respectively. They look like fairly decent TVs, but I'm just concerned about the price. They're AMAZING but they leave me feeling a bit cautious which is why I now turn to you guys. Also I was looking at this Insignia Plasma TV:

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp?id=1142301233866&type=product&skuId=7865465

Your thoughts?

Z
09-29-2006, 12:18 AM
I don't know why, but I do not like rear projection at all. it is either CRT or LCD with me.

frosty
09-29-2006, 12:57 AM
The first TV is a great 720p set. It has HDCP so it's ready for next gen formats. The second one is awesome. True 1080p and HDCP. The third one, well... let's just say your PC monitor can hit higher resolutions than that most likley. It's only 1024x768. Crap.

Reasons not to like rear projection:

1. not as bright.
2. contrast ratio isn't as good
3. large, and cumbersome to move
4. CRT projection TV's must be re-callibrated every time you move it by a professional.
5. the mirrors they project onto get dusty over time, degrading image resolution until you take it apart and clean it. (which is more of a pain in the ass than it sounds like)
6. CRT sets must be calibrated over time even if you do not move them, as the tubes eventually fall out of alignment.
7. Image quality degrades over time on CRT projection TVs.

Reasons not to like plasma:

1. Not as durable as LCD. You must take great care when moving and setting one up.
2. Lower resolution than LCD. Most aren't even capable of hitting 720p natively without downscaling the image.
3. Costs a lot more than LCD.

Reasons not to like LCD:

1. Color isn't as good as plasma.
2. Can be pricey compared to projection units.
3. Can run hot on certain models.
4. Contrast ratio not as good as plasma.

PUNK em 733
09-29-2006, 01:13 AM
Are you sure Plasmas cost more than LCDs, Frosty? From everything I've read, LCD's get to be mighty pricey...esp as sizes go up (40"+)

Which type of HDTV is best for gaming?

Last question (bet you've heard that before;)), what's the best type of HDTV for, well TV watching?

frosty
09-29-2006, 01:16 AM
You have to consider how much you have to pay to get a plasma that can even hit 720p. The highest resolution plasma is 1024x1080. A far cry from 1920x1080 that LCD gives you. So, LCD may cost a lot, but when you factor in exactly what you are getting for the money, you see it still has the better value. As for gaming and TV, LCD FTW.

PUNK em 733
09-29-2006, 01:32 AM
Ahh I see, thanks Frosty! How do you know all this stuff? What do you do?

I'm now gonna look at a 46" Bravia at Costco, but damn I really wanted that 62HM196 Toshiba DLP, just so cheap and big.

frosty
09-29-2006, 01:40 AM
I own a video production company. (I filmed E3xperience for E-mpire)

BTW, I thought I'd elaborate a bit more on why LCD is better for gaming. Plasmas, like CRT TVs, can suffer from burn-in if a still image is left on them for too long. This has been a problem for CRT (especially CRT projection) TVs for a long time. So, gaming on a plasma isn't recommended.

PUNK em 733
09-29-2006, 01:48 AM
I feel a bit better cause I knew that (cookie for me...YAY!!)

What's wrong with DLP for gaming?

I've seen some HDTVs with a "game mode" setting, what does that do?

Luis
09-29-2006, 01:51 AM
I've seen some HDTVs with a "game mode" setting, what does that do?As far as I know, it's quite a rip-off. The advertisements say that it improves the response time and the contrast to obtain better blacks. The truth: it just reduces the brightness, and I didn't see any improvement regarding response time, ghosting, etc. I prefer playing using custom settings.

PUNK em 733
09-29-2006, 01:52 AM
Ahhh I kinda figured it was a gimmick.

frosty
09-29-2006, 02:01 AM
I've made no negative observations with DLP and gaming. I used to game all the time on my DLP projector. However, rear projection TV's may be different.

PUNK em 733
09-29-2006, 02:08 AM
TRUE 1080p: Many market themselves as 1080p, but when you read the spec sheet you find the max res they support as an input is 1080i, which is then de-interlaced into 1080p.

I read that and wondered why exactly it's a bad thing? I was reading about the DLP Toshiba on an A/V forum, and a guy was asking the same thing, and some other dude said this...


the set takes any incoming 1080 signal, and simply deinterlaces it to 1080p, so the image is the samea s if it received 1080p

So is it bad, or fine? I geuss you don't want it to be fiddled with, and just have the TV output the 1080P input as is. What is deinterlacing?

woundingchaney
09-29-2006, 02:09 AM
Google dlps and video lag. Its an issue primarily with the samsung models although other brands seem to have issues as well. It is primarily associated with changing interlaced to progressive format, but there is also complaints associated with scaling as well.


Once again I dont know if it is a current issue but may be something that one would want to check if they are interested in buying a DLP television.

frosty
09-29-2006, 02:14 AM
Well, unless you are playing an older system, you can switch it to progressive scan and take care of that issue. As for scaling, my 800x600 DLP projector did just fine on all resolutions it supported.

Fillibuster
09-29-2006, 02:51 AM
I'll be running my PS3 on my Samsung SyncMaster 940MW. Its got a resolution of 1440x900. 8ms. 700:1 contrast (eh...) So no 1080, but since its only 19" I think 720 will look good enough.

Smokey
09-29-2006, 01:06 PM
and with DLP you can get "rainbow effect"

Garfunkel
09-29-2006, 01:50 PM
DLP's IMO are shocking

LCD's and CRT's for the win

Yo MaMa84
09-29-2006, 02:04 PM
They need to make LCD's with like 0.5ms response..

Luis
09-29-2006, 02:08 PM
They need to make LCD's with like 0.5ms response..If those ever appear, SED technology will have launched by then and be far ahead of them.

ded5850
09-29-2006, 03:02 PM
The first TV is a great 720p set. It has HDCP so it's ready for next gen formats. The second one is awesome. True 1080p and HDCP. The third one, well... let's just say your PC monitor can hit higher resolutions than that most likley. It's only 1024x768. Crap.

Reasons not to like rear projection:

1. not as bright.
2. contrast ratio isn't as good
3. large, and cumbersome to move
4. CRT projection TV's must be re-callibrated every time you move it by a professional.
5. the mirrors they project onto get dusty over time, degrading image resolution until you take it apart and clean it. (which is more of a pain in the ass than it sounds like)
6. CRT sets must be calibrated over time even if you do not move them, as the tubes eventually fall out of alignment.
7. Image quality degrades over time on CRT projection TVs.

Reasons not to like plasma:

1. Not as durable as LCD. You must take great care when moving and setting one up.
2. Lower resolution than LCD. Most aren't even capable of hitting 720p natively without downscaling the image.
3. Costs a lot more than LCD.

Reasons not to like LCD:

1. Color isn't as good as plasma.
2. Can be pricey compared to projection units.
3. Can run hot on certain models.
4. Contrast ratio not as good as plasma.

Ah ok, Thank you. Just wanted to make sure they're worth the money. ANd thanks for the clarification on each type of set. LCD looks like the TV for me.

Mad Rhym'n SkIzZILlS

frosty
09-29-2006, 08:52 PM
Glad to help.

PUNK em 733
09-29-2006, 11:01 PM
and with DLP you can get "rainbow effect"

That hm116 is the 1080P DLP I want, and from the many ppl that have it on the A/V forum, no rainbow effect can be seen, so they say, and it really is exception at producing deep blacks. Many of them play the 360 on them, and love it. I have time though, I'm still comparing.

Smokey
09-30-2006, 07:24 PM
not everyone gets affected buy the "rainbow affect" from DLP. my mate bought a DLP Projecta and he was the only one in his family that could see it lol :) also with LCD you have to/should run them in their native resolution otherwise they can look dodgey

Beenie Man
09-30-2006, 08:38 PM
Can't wait to get a 1080p in mid 2008. Before, I wasn't so big on 1080p and thought it was useless as you needed a big screen to see the difference, and not alot of content was out for it, or many games supporting it. Well after TGS, I am all ready for 1080p. Ridge Racer 7, Gran Tursimo HD, Virtua Tennis 3, Gundam: Target In Sight, Lair, NBA 07, MotorStorm, Forumla 1, etc. were all on 1080p screens and they look spectacular from the vids.

BruceWayneIII
09-30-2006, 08:53 PM
^^ even without dozens of 1080p games during the first months, it definately pays off watching Blu-Ray movies in approximately twice the resolution.

Beenie Man
09-30-2006, 09:22 PM
I have a question. I am planning to get a 1080p Bravia LCD HDTV either late next year or somewhere in 2008. I read the recent news of how the new sets will cost like $2000-2500 dollars for 50'' and up so I am quiet excited. Since most 1080p sets come in 40'', 46'', 50'', and up, I am having a hard time finding the right size. I will be putting it in my living room connected to 5.1 surround sound(Panasonic). I read some reviews on the Bravia V40XBR2, and some reviewers say it has sharper and prettier picture quality than the 46'' and 52'' sized versions because it is storing 2 million pixels progressive on a small screen of 40''. So will I get the same picture quality as the 40'' version if I got a 46'' or 52'' size(including sharpness, clarity, etc.)?

frosty
09-30-2006, 10:23 PM
Many say you notice the pixel increase at 40' and up for 1080p. It all boils down to how far you will be sitting from the TV. The farther away, the bigger the set you need.